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Article Specs

VxAcct: 230739

Article ID: 4347

Section: whs

Age Group: Adult

Posted: July 1st. 2002

Views: 32439

Mike Warnke [1]

by Kerr Cuhulain

One of the things that the supporters of the international Satanic conspiracy myth rely on most heavily is the testimonials of "survivors". These are the people who allege that they were formerly members of the Satanic cult but have escaped, usually by becoming a Christian. They are often supported by a "therapist" who wants to believe them. Commonly the events that they describe are supposed to have occurred in their youth. Often they claim to have been the person being groomed to be a future leader of the cult. The survivor almost invariably claims to have been the high priest or high priestess. This in itself is a clue to the bogus nature of such claims. Although the cults described by such "survivors" allegedly have hundreds if not thousands of members, we are expected to believe that it is never the peripheral players that leave, which is what you'd expect to be the most common scenario.

What facts these stories give you often don't correspond to any known traditional patterns of Satanism, but do often correspond to earlier accounts by other survivors or to sensational accounts of "witchcraft" during the Inquisition. Some therapists and investigators have pointed to the similarities in the many stories, saying that the fact that these similar stories are surfacing in so many different places is proof that the cult is widespread. In fact, all this really proves is that the myth is widespread and the similar natures of the stories is usually due to them being adapted by the story teller from the published disclosures of earlier so called "survivors" reported in the popular press.

Supporters of the Satanic Conspiracy theory often attempt to convince us that the stories of the survivors must be true simply because they sound plausible. They say that it is not possible for a person who has not been exposed to Satanic rituals to have made this sort of story up. In fact it is quite easy to invent such a story and many authors of popular horror fiction have done so. An example of such an author is E. F. Benson, who wrote macabre horror stories such as The Sanctuary. Though Benson had never seen a Satanic ceremony, his father was an Archbishop of Canterbury who made his son aware of the Church's beliefs about Satanism at an early age. Consequently he was able to write stories that sounded very plausible, but were entirely the product of his imagination.

If we look back a few years we can see that there was one book that is clearly the prototype for the bogus survivor stories that followed it: The Satan Seller.

The Satan Seller was a book written by Michael Warnke. The Satan Seller purports to be a biography of Warnke's experiences as a high priest of Satanism. Warnke has used this book to build himself a lucrative ministry and to present himself as an expert on Satanic crime and lecture to law enforcement agencies. It launched his career as a Christian author and stand up comic too, resulting in several books, making 12 comedy recordings and 2 videos. But as you are about to see, his supposedly autobiographical book isfictitious. The beginning of the current hysteria about an international Satanic conspiracy can be directly traced to this book, which came out in 1972. Jon Trott, a Christian journalist, states: "We believe The Satan Seller has been responsible, more than any other single volume in the Christian market, for promoting the current nationwide 'Satanism scare. '"This book was a collaborative effort between Warnke, whose autobiography it is supposed to be, Christian author/publisher David Balsiger and writer Les Jones.

Although The Satan Seller is allegedly a biography of Michael Warnke, it will be useful to look at Warnke's supporter and co author David Balsiger first, as this will show you where some of the major influences motivating Warnke originate. David W. Balsiger is a former writer and photographer for the Anaheim Bulletin and twelve other Southern California newspapers. He was a frequent "Debate Page" columnist for USA Today. He worked for a while as the Public Relations Consultant for the Melodyland Christian Center belonging to evangelist Morris Cerullo. He went on to become a major source of literature on "occult crime. "

Balsiger has authored 18 non-fiction books, including: In Search of Noah's Ark (Sunn-New American Library), The Lincoln Conspiracy (New American Library) and Beyond Defeat (Doubleday).

Both In Search of Noah's Ark and The Lincoln Conspiracy were later made into feature films. Balsiger later admitted to faking the photography for the film "In Search of Noah's Ark", which was purported to be a real account of the finding of Noah's ark.

Balsiger is a founding member of Christian Voice, formerly the steering committee for the right wing Coalition on Revival. He is also the founder of the National Citizen's Action Network (NCAN) in Costa Mesa, California. NCAN publishes a newsletter called "Scoreboard Alert". NCAN is the parent for three further organizations and publishes three magazines, as follows:
1)RAMBOC (Restore A More Benevolent Order Coalition), a right wing networking organization. Balsiger is the founder/president. He calls this a "human rights advocacy group" and claims it is composed of 285 organizations, none of which he names.

2)Biblical News Service.

3)Writeway Professional Literary Associates.

4)Scoreboard Magazines, which include:

a)Family Protection Scoreboard.

b)Candidates Biblical Scoreboard.

c)Presidential Biblical Scoreboard.
A 1987 special issue of Balsiger's Scoreboard magazine was entitled "South Africa: A Nation on Trial". In it Balsiger supported the apartheid policies of the former South African government. It was subsidized by $300,000 worth of advertising paid for by the South African government's tourist agency, SATOUR, and this issue was later handed out by the South African consulate. Balsiger was also the exclusive U. S. distributor of The Aida Parker Newsletter, a pro-apartheid magazine written by an agent of the Bureau of State Security (BOSS)in South Africa.

An example of Balsiger's Presidential Biblical Scoreboard is his 1988 General Election Edition. This magazine is advertized as telling where presidential, congressional and gubernatorial candidates stand on what Balsiger calls "family-moral-freedom issues". He "advocates electing presidential candidates who are pro biblical in the evangelical tradition, pro family values, pro morality and pro freedom". He lists 34 congressmen whom he considers to be "Marxist-Leninist, homosexual, child molesters, liars, crooks, drunkards, and womanizers". He lists how congressmen voted on issues of interest to Fundamentalist Christians. In this issue he includes an article describing how Governor Dukakis of Massachusetts named Laurie Cabot of the WLPAthe "Official Witch of Salem". Balsiger's article is obviously meant to discredit Dukakis.

Family Protection Scoreboard is the same sort of thing. For example, Family Protection Scoreboard published a special edition on Liberation Theology including an article by Richard Wurmbrand: "Karl Marx's Ties With Satanism. "

In 1983 Balsiger founded the Ban The Soviets Coalition, which sought to have the Soviet Union banned from the 1984 Olympic Games. His associates in this venture were:

Anthony Mazeika, the vice-president of the Baltic-American Freedom League, is known to the World Jewish Congress as an instigator of efforts to block investigations and deportations of Nazi war criminals by the U. S. Office of Special Investigations.

"Father" R. David Finzer, the former leader of the youth affiliate of the World Anti-Communist League and was defrocked by the American Episcopal Church in 1979.

Gene Vosseler, whom Balsiger describes as "like a right arm for me", is a high ranking member of Elizabeth Claire Prophet's "Church Universal and Triumphant", a well known Christian cult group.

With the help of 112 right wing organizations, Balsiger vowed to disrupt the 1984 Olympic Games if the Soviets attended. Balsiger told journalists that members of his group had "infiltrated" the Olympics organizing committee and planned to offer "safe houses" for any Soviets willing to defect. RAMBOC was formed out of the remnants of the Ban the Soviets Coalition.

Writeway publishes the "investigative tools" that both Balsiger and his friend Jack Roper of CARIS (Christian Apologetics: Research and Information Service) have written for police on the subject of occult related crime. Both Writeway and CARIS send out the same (Writeway) list of available literature and slides.

An example of Balsiger's "investigative tools" is his "1988 Witchcraft/Satanism Ritual Calendar". His one page introduction lumps Witchcraft and Satanism together. He then lists 95 ritual dates plus 4 weeks devoted to "kidnapping, holding and ceremonial preparation of person for human sacrifice (sic)" for a total of 123 days a year (i. e. : 33. 7% or a third of the entire year). Many of the dates on Balsiger's calendar are simply dates of the different phases of the moon as well as the dates of solar and lunar eclipses. The calendar's 95 ritual dates call for 13 animal sacrifices, 24 human sacrifices, 6 blood rituals and 12 sexual orgies, as well as miscellaneous mutilations and dismemberments. Surely this much activity would be noticed by someone?One also wonders how someone could keep a full time job and find time for all of this activity?

The rest of the calendar is inaccurate and absurd. Dates that Balsiger lists include:
1)"January 1-New Years Day. A Druid feast day. "

2)"January 20-St Agnes Eve. Divination practiced. "This is a date in British folklore considered to be a good day for divination. Women were supposed to be able to use various forms of divination to determine what their future husband would look like. This is probably on the list due to its connection with divination, which is prohibited in the Bible.

3)"January 20-27- Sacrifice preparation. Kidnapping, holding and ceremonial preparation of person for human sacrifice. "

4)"January 26- Grand Climax. Five weeks and one day after winter solar solstice. Da Muer ritual. Oral, anal and vaginal sex. Human sacrifice-female or child. "

5)"February 1-Candlemas Eve. Welcoming spring. "Would Satanists do a ritual to welcome spring?

6)"February 14-Shrovetide. "Shrovetide is the day three days before Ash Wednesday and is a Christian observance. It also happens to be St Valentine's Day in 1988, which isn't a Satanic celebration either.

7)"March 24-Feast of the Beast: Sixteen year becomes Bride of Satan in marriage ceremony (sic). "

8)"March 31-Maundy Thursday, Unholy Thursday... April 1. Good Friday, Day of Passion. Mocks death of Christ. Animal or human sacrifice-male only... April 2. Easter Eve day. Human sacrifice- male or female... April 3. Easter Day, Unholy Sunday... Human sacrifice- male, female, or child. Followed by three days of fasting and chanting. "

9)April 25-Grand Climax. Five weeks and one day after Spring Equinox. Da Muer ritual. Sexual activity-oral, anal and/or vaginal sex. Female child sacrifice. The sacrifice can be a child. "

10)"May 13: Friday the thirteenth... Samhain. Old celebration date until 8th century. "The fact that this date happens to be Friday the thirteenth is of no religious significance whatsoever. Balsiger is only partially correct about Samhain. Samhain has always been observed on October 31. It is the Christian "Feast of All Souls" that used to be on May 13. It was moved to November 1 by the Church in the 8th century CE in order that it would coincide with Samhain and give the people a Christian alternative to Samhain.

11)"Corpus Christi. Mockery of the feast of the body and blood of Christ. "More Christian festival dates.

12)"June 20-Summer Solstice... June 23- Midsummer's Eve, St John's (the Baptist) Eve. Invokes the sun at the height of its strength. "Obviously Balsiger doesn't understand that the "summer solstice" and "midsummer" are the same thing.

13)"July 10- Unholy Day of the Palladium. Reading of the old Satanism ritual books. "The Palladium was a statue of Pallas Athena, the Greek Goddess of justice, that was said to have stood in the city of Troy, upon whom the safety of the city depended. It later came to be used to refer to any statue of Athena, or to any safeguard of a city or institution. There was no ancient Greek or Roman festival on this date, and it was not a date sacred to Athena, so it is hard to imagine what Balsiger is on about here. July 10 was a festival of the northern European Goddesses Holda, Hela and Skadi, all underworld deities. Balsiger might be including this date because of this connection, but he makes no indication that this is the case.

14)"August 24: St Bartholomew's Day. Fire Festival ceremonial meeting. "In ancient Rome this was the date of the Mania, a festival acknowledging the Manes, deified spirits of ancestors. It was also St Bartholomew's day, Bartholomew being the patron of butchers and tanners. It was never a fire festival. St Bartholomew's day is traditionally considered to be a weather marker day as witnessed by the old rhyme: "If Bartlemy's Day be fair and clear, Hope for a prosperous autumn this year. "

15)"September 20: Midnight Host. Blood ritual. "

16)"October 22-29. Sacrifice preparation. "

17)"October 29... October 30. Satanist High Holy Day. Related to Halloween. Human Sacrifices. "

18)"November 24. Thanksgiving Day. Usually Wiccan celebration. "

25)"December 29. St Thomas Day. Fire festival or ritual ceremony... Thursday after Christmas. "
A few of the dates, names and expressions used in Balsiger's this calendar were drawn from the 15th Century document the Malleus Maleficarum or "Hammer of Witches. "Another source is Montague Summers, a translator of the Malleus Maleficarum and the author of several sensational books on "witchcraft" and Satanism. Summers was a self-proclaimed "Monsignor" in the Old Catholic Church and a paedophile who fed his imagination on information gleaned from Inquisitional records.

Next, oddly, Balsiger includes a copy of a 1980 ritual calendar from the Egyptian Fellowship of Isis, which is reasonably accurate as far as Egyptian Paganism is concerned, and has no mention of ritual sacrifice at all. He does not explain what it is doing in his book or why the dates in it are at variance with those in his supposed ritual calendar.

On July 9,1988 I sent a list of corrections and Pagan festival dates to Balsiger. I received a short but courteous letter dated July 27, 1988 thanking me for bringing this to his attention. Yet I spoke to a friend of mine in the third week of March 1989 who said that they had written to Balsiger about his awful calendar too. This source said that they had just been asked by Balsiger to supply him with correct Pagan festival dates. The one previously sent by me was not mentioned. To the best of my knowledge these calendars were never subsequently revised by Balsiger.

Having looked at Balsiger, Michael Warnke's co author and supporter, let's return to Warnke's book, The Satan Seller. The Satan Seller begins with Warnke describing the dysfunctionality of his home life, describing his alcoholic father. He blames his father's condition on his mother, though it is obvious from the story that his father was a drunk before his marriage to Warnke's mother, his fifth marriage. He also tells how his mother "beat [him] whenever she had the chance. "He describes how his father was "fixing prize fights and racketeering with the unions" and how his father used to openly sell drugs at a truck stop in Warnke's presence.

In The Satan Seller, Warnke says that after his father died he moved in briefly with his two aunts, Dorothy and Edna. Warnke alleged in his "Tennessee Home and Blankety Blank" comedy album that he shocked his aunts with his constant use of obscenities. His aunt, Edna Swindell, told Cornerstone magazine journalists that "He was just a typical boy. We had no problems. "When asked if Warnke was a foul mouthed trouble maker, Swindell replied, "He wasn't that here. "

- In July 1959 Warnke moved to live with his half sister and brother-in-law, in Crestline, CA. This was a Catholic household, and they sent him off to Catholic school.

Warnke states in his book that "by the time I graduated from Rim of The World High School, I had a genuine full-scale drinking problem. "Warnke says that he was hanging out with a very rough crowd. This is contradicted by the testimonies of his high school friends Tim Smith and David Goodwin, both altar boys at St. Francis Cabrini Church, and another friend Jeff Nesmith. Nesmith reports: "We'd spend lots of time at each other's houses, go to school dances together, proms, and one summer Mike and I worked for my dad in the construction business. We weren't hellions, but we weren't angels either. We had our parties, gatecrashed some dances. "Smith reports: "Sometimes Mike attended Mass with us. "

Warnke went on to San Bernardino Valley College. He states that at college he continued his heavy drinking: "I attended classes regularly at first, but I wasn't about to cut down on my drinking. As the days went by, it became harder to concentrate on what the professors were saying, but I could still talk my way out of anything, and this carried me through. I was drinking so much by now, it was starting to wreck my stomach. "One of Mike's college friends, Greg Gilbert, has a different story: "We drank occasional, but mostly we just talked about it. We weren't of age, and alcohol was hard to come by. "

It was at this college that Warnke claims that a person identified in his book as "Dean Anderson" introduced him to marijuana. Warnke says that he "... really liked marijuana. "But there was no one at San Bernardino Valley College by that name or who even resembled the person described by Warnke, according to college friends spoken to by Cornerstone Reporters Jon Trott and Mike Hertenstein. Gilbert states: "Drugs?No way, not at Valley, and not in 1965. Two years later there was plenty of grass around, but back in '65 we still believed in Reefer Madness. "Another college associate, Dyana Cridelich, states: " None of us were into drugs. We didn't even smoke cigarettes. "

Yet Warnke claims that he was not only using marijuana heavily, but that he later used peyote, LSD, heroin, speed and mescaline. Warnke states: "Some doctors came to the campus to conduct controlled group experiments on [LSD]. My friends and I decided to volunteer for the tests. "Not only do his college friends refute this, but according to San Bernardino Valley College records, no LSD experiments took place on the campus. Dr. George Zaharopoulos, head of the Social Sciences Department at Valley states: "I taught here during those years, and we never, ever, asked for or had any LSD experiments take place here. This is only a junior college. "

On his "Mike Warnke Alive!" comedy album, Warnke further claims: "I'd had hepatitis four times from shooting up with dirty needles. I had scabs all over my face from shooting up with crystal. I was a speed freak. I weighed 110 pounds soaking wet. My skin had turned yellow. My hair was falling out. My teeth were rotting out of my head. I'd been pistol-whipped five or six times. My jaw had been broken. My nose had been almost ripped off. I had a bullet hole in my right leg, two bullet holes in my left leg. "

None of Warnke's college friends saw any evidence of these injuries, symptoms or problems. Greg Gilbert states: "Without us knowing it?It's a lie. "Lois Eckenrod, who was to become Warnke's fiance, states: "That's just make believe. Mike never fell in with drugs. My dad was an alcoholic, and because of our family situation... I was really sensitive to things like that. Second, I was training to be a nurse, and I think I would have known if he was using drugs. I wouldn't have dated Mike if he was drugged. I didn't even allow people to drink around me. "

Warnke says that he began to dress in "weird" clothing, and makes the rather chauvinistic statement: "You know, weird people attract chicks. That's why you hear about more girls running away than boys". Later he states: "There was a chick, Louisa, who would stay at my apartment on Pershing Avenue two or three nights a week. I took it out on her; she was my whipping girl. "Later when Warnke alleges to have been initiated into the Satanic cult, he describes himself as having waist length white hair and six inch fingernails painted black.

Photos of Warnke taken April 30, 1966, when he supposedly was a long haired, emaciated drug addict with long black finger nails, show Warnke to be a healthy, normal looking young male with ear length short hair wearing horn rimmed glasses. Gilbert states that "He looked like everybody else. "

Warnke claims that "Dean" later invited him to a drug and sex party in a mansion in Redlands where Warnke claims to have been introduced to Satanism. Warnke uses the term "witchcraft" interchangeably with "satanism" from this point on, mixing in snippets of general information relating to Wicca to give the impression that these two religions are one in the same. He paints a picture of an international organization with three basic levels. Warnke is probably trying to draw a parallel between his three levels and the three levels of initiation found in the average Wiccan tradition, but Warnke's levels are completely separate from one another, members of higher levels rarely deigning to visit those lower down except on business.

The first level described by Warnke is the level at which the Satanists supposedly used sex parties to recruit people. Warnke states: "It boils down to getting them gradually involved, leading up to the drug and witchcraft bit by easy stages. "Warnke claims that he spent quite a bit of time "recruiting people for witchcraft. "Then Warnke claims that he discovered the second level:

"I quickly pieced together the witchcraft scene... One thing did become clear to me, however;this witchcraft thing was BIG-a whole lot bigger than even the most sensational journalism imagined. It wasn't just a kicky fad with people playing 'lets pretend'. These people were for real and they played for keeps. When they went after a soul, it was like they were pulling their chairs up to a steak dinner. "

Warnke claimed that the occult provides "unlimited drugs, sex and affluence,"describing meetings at the "secondary" level as being similar to church services:

"... with calculated blasphemy the outstanding feature... but no honest-to-badness afflicting or even oppressing... [and going] through phony rituals that seemed pretty tame and hardly resulted in anyone getting hurt or attacked or anything... The Witches were mostly eighteen to thirty years of age, men and women from all walks of life, and I mean ALL: salesmen, carpenters, teachers, students, college professors, housewives, clerks, businessmen, truck drivers, and even a few preachers and priests. We were mostly white and educated, but it was open to all comers, and we had an integrated, ecumenical base that any institution would be proud of... There were students of Satanism (utilizing the power of the devil through worship); demonology (summoning different demons-the devil's helpers);necromancy (communication with the dead by the conjuring up of spirits);vampires (belief in vampires, blood sucking ghosts);lycanthropy (assumption of the form and traits of a wolf via witchcraft). "

Then Warnke tells us how he was invited to a meeting of the third level. He calls the leader of the group he describes a "Master Counsellor". Later he describes his ambition to become a "Master Counsellor", trying to improve his chances of promotion by intensifyinghis "studies of witchcraft and magic. "Warnke describes several other titles in this book as well: "Keeper of the Seal", "Keeper of the Books", "Counsellor of the Books" and "Master of Rituals". These titles are all peculiar to Warnke's description of Satanism. They did not appear in any previous book on Satanism and there are no such titles in any Satanic organization today.

Warnke refers to this alleged Satanic group as "The Brotherhood". You will notice the name of this imaginary organization over and over again in literature written by other authors discussed in this book. Warnke has the members of "The Brotherhood" giving each other a "special handshake with the little and index fingers extended. "Later Warnke identifies this organization as the Illuminati, and describes it as a fourth stage.

The Illuminati was a group founded in 1776 by Adam Weishaupt, a professor of law in Ingolstadt, Bavaria. The purpose of Weishaupt's organization was to abolish monarchies. It was a secret society because republican ideas were very radical then. Weishaupt disugised the Illuminati's aims under a veil of occultism.

The Illuminati grew rapidly but eventually some disgruntled members, having discovered that the organization was simply a front for Weishaupt's anti-royalist activities, informed the authorities. Weishaupt fled and the organization was shut down.

The idea that the Illuminati is still in existence came from a treatise written in 1797 by a Jesuit: Abbe Barruel. Barruel claimed that the French Revolution was the result of an ancient conspiracy which could be traced back to the Knights Templar and a Moslem sect called the Assasins. Barruel claimed that the Knights Templar had not been stamped out by the Church in 1314, but had gone underground and ultimately resurfaced as the Freemasons and the Illuminati. Barruel claimed that this secret network was allied to the "Sons of Satan," which was Barruel's name for Jews. Barruel claimed that the leader of the international conspiracy was a Grand Master who ordered assassinations and started revolutions to bring about a single world government, led by the Anti-Christ.

Warnke describes the Illuminati as:

"A worldwide, super-secret control group with perhaps as few as a dozen at the very top-with key men controlling governments, economies, armies, food supplies-pulling the strings on every major international event-and not just now, but for generations, centuries, since the beginning of civilization-manipulating men by their egos and their appetites, rewarding and depriving, enraging and pacifying, raising up first one side and then the other, maintaining a balance of frustration, bitterness and despair... They did it through a Satanic knowledge of all the centres of self, self- love, indulgence, superiority, pride, righteousness-and they gently nudged the most ambitious and promising toward the final motivation hook: power-for power was the ultimate lust... But the whole thing was too complex, too unpredictable- the most efficient human organization on earth could not possibly keep track of everything... I saw it... There was somebody who could mastermind the whole thing... Satan!That explained the unbelievable coordination, how financiers could work in tandem with politicians and industrialists, often without direct contact or even conscious collusion... with only a relative handful of men on earth even aware of what was really going on-the Illuminati... and there was no need for them to be the leaders, the presidents, the premiers... far, better, in fact, if they were not, for they could operate more effectively in anonymity... but they influenced the leaders... and they had the use of demons. "

Warnke goes on to claim that Hitler, Nero, the Borgias, Stalin, Lee Harvey Oswald and Sirhan B. Sirhan were all puppets of demons that possessed them. You can see Balsiger's ideas sprinkled liberally throughout these ridiculous statements by Warnke.

Warnke attempts to verify his claims about the Illuminati later in his book by giving us the testimonial of pastor Tim LaHaye:

"... it's a top secret organization, Mike. But I've done quite a bit of research. The Illuminati was started May 1, 1776, and the word itself means 'Holders of the Light. 'In this case, it's a Satanic light. Members think they alone have the wisdom to run the world. It's really only the continuation of a Satanic organization that has been in existence since about 1100 A. D. Oh, under various names of course... We should be fighting it from a grass-roots level, educating people about how they can avoid falling into the traps of Satan, such as witchcraft and Satanism. You and Sue need a few more friends praying for you... Our congregation is ready to help you, and we've got some very strong prayer warriors in our church. '"

LaHaye was the pastor of Scott Memorial Baptist Church in San Diego. He was also the Issues and Publication consultant for David Balsiger's Biblical Scoreboard Magazines. LaHaye has written two books: What Everyone Should Know About Homosexuality and The Battle for the Mind. He co-authored a third with John Morris: The Ark on Ararat.

Warnke describes the third level ritual as taking place in a nine foot circle. At least seven people are in this nine foot circle according to Warnke's description, although he doesn't give an exact number. In a nine foot circle Warnke finds an altar in the center, "a granite slab supported on two sawhorses. On the slab, a girl lay on her back, nude and waiting, her skin glowing red in the light given off by the candles and the balefire burning in a crucible nearby. An inverted cross and an image of a goat's head stood at each end of the altar. "

The idea of a nine foot magic circle is borrowed from the grimoires of the Middle Ages, and was a circle intended to accommodate a lone magician, or at most, a magician and two assistants. It is very common to find people inventing stories about magic rituals borrowing this dimension to make their description sound more realistic. This is precisely why you can tell why their descriptions are falsified: Try putting seven people and a stone slab big enough to hold a prone human as well as a "balefire", goat's heads, crosses, candles and other paraphernalia in a nine foot circle and you'll see that this is something like those college pranks where you see how many people you can jam into a phone booth or a Volkswagen.

Warnke later says that he and another member of the group picked up the altar, which he describes as a "piece of black marble granite... a hunk of granite from a monument company... at least six inches thick. "Of course granite and marble are two different types of stone. I called Quadra Stone in Vancouver, a company that supplies stone to monument companies and to stone masons, as well as a geologist friend of mine to check this out. Working on the assumption that the slab was black marble 6 inches thick as Warnke described, a minimum of 5 feet long and 3 feet wide to allow a person to lie prone on it, the approximate weight of a slab this size would be between 750 and 1000 pounds: Given that Warnke describes himself as an emaciated heroin addict at this time (and that we can assume that his companion was in the same predicament), I find it rather hard to believe that Warnke and his friend could have handled a piece of stone this size.

Warnke next describes how "Words attributed to Satan were read from the book, The Great Mother,... " This is another item peculiar to Warnke's description of Satanism. There is no such book. The incantations that Warnke describes all end with the phrase, "And as I will, so mote it be. "This is a common ending for Wiccan invocations, so his naming this spurious book "The Great Mother" suggests that he is trying to make the reader believe that there is a connection between Wicca and Satanism here. As becomes obvious from what we've seen as well as what follows, Warnke doesn't know very much about either subject.

Warnke claims that his group used incense containing "deadly nightshade - belladona" which put him in "the right frame of mindlessness. "At the end Warnke claims that he "could almost make out the hazy outline as a demon spirit floated out of that pentagram [on the girl's stomach] and seemed to make a buzzing sound as it dissipated and presumably transferred itself to the locale where it was to do its mischief. "

(Continued... Click HERE for page II)






ABOUT...

Kerr Cuhulain


Location: Surrey, British Columbia

Website: http://www.officersofavalon.com

Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

Email Kerr: cuhulain@telus.net

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