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Article Specs

VxAcct: 230739

Article ID: 4644

Section: whs

Age Group: Adult

Posted: September 2nd. 2002

Views: 18086

David Brown [3]

by Kerr Cuhulain

One of the people that relies on Brown as a resource is Lieutenant Larry Jones (who I discussed in an earlier article). In Larry Jones' "File 18" newsletter Brown makes another bizarre claim about Halloween:

"The god whom the Druids worshiped was Baal, as the blazing Baal-fires show... we know they offered human sacrifices...we have evidence that they made 'their children pass through the fire to Molech', and that makes it highly probable that they also offered them in sacrifice... we find that these things were parts of one and the same system... Priests of Nimrod or Baal were necessarily required to eat of the human sacrifices; and thus it has come to pass the 'Cahna-Bal', (Canha is the emphatic form of Cahn which means 'a priest') meaning the priest of Baal, is the established word in our tongue for a devourer of human flesh [emphasis in original]."(28)

Brown's etymology is imaginative but entirely inaccurate. "Cannibal" is a name originally given by the conquering Spaniards to the Carib peoples of the West Indies. It is a variation of the word "Caribes", first used by Christopher Columbus, which comes in turn from the word "Carib" in the Arawakan language of the Caribbean and South America. "Carib" is related to the name that the Carib's gave to themselves: "Galibi" ("strong men"). The word cannibal later came to mean people who eat human flesh because these early Spaniards believed that the Carib people did so. It has absolutely nothing to do with the Bible or Middle Eastern history. As I have pointed out before, Baal was a Phoenician deity, Nimrod a king who appears in the Bible and Molech a name derived from a Hebrew term meaning "king". None of these names is or was used by Druids.

David Brown is telling us over and over that "...Halloween accentuates mutilation, murder, blood, guts and gore. It even glorifies it!"(29) and that "HALLOWEEN IS HARMFUL BECAUSE OF THE EMPHASIS ON FEAR [emphasis in original]."(30) But the person accentuating these awful things is Brown (and people like him). It is the hysteria that people like Brown insist upon creating that is perpetuating these myths.

Brown does not differentiate Wicca from Satanism. He does recognize that Wiccans deny any connection Yet Brown simply dismisses this as irrelevant:

"You could not celebrate Halloween without the WITCH. The oldest known illustration of a witch dates back to the pre Columbian era. The drawing shows the pagan goddess Tlazolteolf naked, wearing a pointed hat and riding a broomstick. Where you find witchcraft you will find nudity, divination, gross immorality and occultic practices to name just a few. According to the Old Testament of the Bible witchcraft and the whole spectrum of the occult were capital crimes, punishable by death. In the New Testament, in Galatians 5:20, witchcraft is listed among those things that are to be renounced by believers... Popular West Coast Bible teacher Dr. John MacArthur expresses it clearly enough when he says, 'Dressing up like witches, ghosts, or goblins is incompatible with a Christian's testimony. Furthermore, many of the customs of Halloween are associated with the worst kind of pagan ceremonies; they are usually centered on the sinister things such as demons, witchcraft and superstition'".(31)

Dr. John MacArthur is the author of the book The Charismatics. How Brown figures that he can use Tlazolteoff, an aboriginal Central American deity, as an example of the practices of Wicca, a spirituality based on Northern European mythology, is anybody's guess.

Brown also produces some of Peter Haining's material:

"Let me share with you some material I found in An Illustrated History of Witchcraft, by Peter Haining. He states: 'The witch is, without doubt, one of the most enduring figures in superstition and literature. Whether portrayed as an aged crone astride a broomstick off on some mission of evil, or else a young girl dancing naked with her companions in a wooded grove, she can be found in carvings of antiquity or the columns of today's newspapers...since the Middle Ages, (writings have) shown her as an enemy of humanity, a solitary being able to compact with the Devil to work all manner of supernatural powers."(32)

Haining's work is based on Inquisitional material such as that of Montague Summers rather than modern knowledge of Witchcraft. Haining has written other books such as The Satanists, an anthology of popular Satanic horror stories by popular authors. What Haining is describing here is a stereotypical image presented in the kind of popular fiction he writes about, not an actual description of a Wiccan.

Brown claims that:

"Witches and Satanists love Halloween. They get a lot of media coverage around that time of year. It's good P.R. (public relations) for them. That coverage usually portrays them in a favourable light. In addition, it generates interest in "the craft" and is good for recruitment purposes. As Craig Hawkins puts it, '...with increasing vigor, witchcraft is coming 'out of the broom closet.' Many witches are actively seeking public understanding and acceptance. Despite the public relations campaign to 'sell' the public on the 'virtues' of witchcraft, modern day witches and Satanists still worship demon gods & goddesses, practice bizarre and immoral sexual rituals, and certain groups offer animal and human sacrifices."(33)

It is true that many Wiccans are actively seeking public understanding and acceptance. The reason that they are doing this is because people like Brown are disseminating misinformation like this about them.

Brown then quotes fundamentalist Christian author Texe Marrs:

"Noted New Age Researcher Texe Marrs said this about the activities of witches on Halloween: 'Our own research confirms that on this unholy night [Halloween], witches' covens meet, drink, dance, spit out curses and spells, conjure up spirits, engage in sexual orgies, induct new members, and offer up animal and human sacrifices. (Witches have become expert at covering up these sacrifices by use of cremation ovens and the use of privately owned land preserves for disposal of bodies in deeply dug graves)... Somewhere in America in the week prior to this coming Halloween, children will be kidnaped by witches and become statistics as 'missing children'...While chances of your children being snatched may be remote, never the less we believe caution and good judgement is in order."(34)

Texe Marrs is a notable researcher in that he produces a mass of misinformation as inaccurate as Brown does. As I pointed out earlier, statistics prove that the chances of your child being snatched by Satanists are practically non-existent. I'll discuss the works of Texe Marrs in more detail in a later article in this series.

Later in this File 18 report, Brown contradicts his earlier statements suggesting that Witchcraft and Satanism are synonymous:

"...Witches would have you believe witchcraft is different from Satanism. In a minor sense they are correct. Satanism is the rebellion against and reversal of Christianity. A practicing witch put it this way, 'Satanism is basically a reversion and perversion of Christian symbolism'. Witchcraft, on the other hand is not a reaction to Christianity but pagan worship of the Mother Goddess and her consort the Horned God. Witches (Wiccans) claim they don't even acknowledge Satan. But a former Alexandrian Wiccan witch clarified this by stating, 'as I got to the higher degrees I learned that the name of the horned god was Lucifer. I learned that the sign of the second degree was an inverted pentagram...symbolizing the horns of Satan.' (Quote from "Devil Worship: The Rise of Satanism", by Jeremiah films) [emphasis in original]."(35) You'll remember this quote from earlier, since what Brown doesn't tell you is that the so called "Witch" that he is referring to here is here is Bill Schnoebelen. Earlier in this series I showed you that Schnoebelen's claims of this sort are fictitious.

Next Brown contradicts this statement in turn by returning to his original theme:

"Though witches like to make a distinction between themselves and Satanists, there really is NO DISTINCTION biblically speaking. They might play little word games masking the connection between Lucifer and Satan but the power behind Satanism and Witchcraft is the same; Satan, (formerly called Lucifer before his rebellion against God) and his demonic hordes. When the Bible makes reference to witchcraft it means anyone who is involved in some form of the occult [emphasis in original]."(36)

In other words, Brown is using the term "witch" as a generic term for anything he deems occult, in a fashion similar to the Inquisitors of centuries past. Brown then muddies the water by coming up with the following definition:

"Religious Occultist- These people openly belong to an official occult group. Their group is often tax exempt and is protected by the first amendment. They deny involvement in any criminal activity and seek to present their beliefs as a legitimate religion. Lori Cabot (official witch of Salem, Mass.) heads the Temple of Isis (sic). There is the Church of Circle Wicca, The Witches International Craft Association, The Temple of Set, The Church of Satan, Covenant of the Goddess, etc."(37)

Brown has made several glaring errors here. Laurie Cabot's name is spelled incorrectly for one thing. The Witches International Craft Association is obviously a variation on the W.I.C.C.A. Letters myth that I discuss in detail in my book The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca. Brown's remarks about "legitimate religion" demonstrate that even though these organizations are legally incorporated religious groups, Brown does not wish to recognize them as such.

Brown posted an anti-Wiccan article on his web site in 1997: "Unmasking The Truth About Witches: Their Deceptive Schemes, Old Tricks & Dirty Lies." He opens by stating:

"I have a news article in my files entitled, Witches Seek Mainstream Status. To be sure witches are out of the broom closet and walking down main street. In fact, they are going to great lengths to sanitize their reputation and remake their image. That is easy to see when you see media articles with titles like - Witches spell it out: Don't Stereotype Us, and I Am Not A Wicked Witch. In the process of trying to remake themselves to be acceptable to mainstream Americans they use deceptive schemes, old tricks and dirty lies to accomplish their goal."(38)

Brown tries to justify this statement by claiming that modern Wiccans use the term Wicca rather than Witch because they want to "white wash"(39) the term Witch. He accuses modern Wiccans of "historical revisionism."(40) Yet he admits that "As early as 890 A.D. the word "wiccan" was used to identify witches 'in the Laws of King Alfred.'"(41) Wicca and Wicce were the original terms which evolved through the spelling "Wiche" to the more modern spelling "Witch." This isn't revisionism. Some modern Witches are simply using the original term Wicca.

Brown continues:

"While Wicca has a modern origin, they eclecticly [sic] draw upon diabolical occult information, rituals, and ceremonies from idol worshippers of the past. In fact, they use a deceptive scheme involving semantic word games to deny their involvement with the Devil and or Satan. For instance, Wiccans will tell you that they believe in Lucifer. They claim that "he is the god of the Sun and of the Moon." However most knowledgeable Wiccans recognize that the book La Sorciere by French historian Jules Michelet is a major contributer to their cult (The English version is published by Citadel Press under the title Satanism and Witchcraft). But, here's the facts. "Michelet's book is full of passionate, sympathetic depictions of Satan and medieval witchcraft.

"Then there is the book by Charles G. Leland - Aradia:Gospel of the Witches, which is another major source of Wiccan beliefs. The very first paragraph reads 'Diana greatly loved her brother Lucifer, the god of the Sun and of the Moon, the god of Light, who was so proud of his beauty, and who for his pride was driven from Paradise.' GOTCHA! This is a reference to Isaiah 14 in the Bible where Lucifer is expelled from the presence of God and becomes the Devil or Satan! In fact, Isaiah 14:12 (KJV) is the only passage where Lucifer is mentioned in the entire Bible. Otherwise he is called the Devil, Satan, the Dragon, etc."(42)

Charles Geoffrey Leland was a lawyer and soldier of fortune who wrote Aradia in 1899. This was allegedly a description of traditional Tuscan witchcraft as described to Leland by a Witch named Maddelena and a translation of their "gospel," which Leland named 'Vangelo." It bears a striking resemblance to Jules Michelet's earlier book, La Sorciere. Leland's works clearly influenced early Wiccan leaders, such as Gardner, Valiente, Sanders and Farrrar, to name but a few. This was before Leland's assumptions and research were called into question by scholars. The original "Charge of the Goddess" and the concept of ritual nudity were also probably drawn by Gardner from Leland's works.

Lucifer is a Latin name meaning "bringer of light" ("lucis" ("light") and "ferre" ("to bear")). It first appeared in the Bible in Isaiah 14:12: "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! How art thou cut down to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!" The original word translated from the later Hebrew texts as "Lucifer" in the Bible was "Helel." Some scholars argue that this indicates that it was, in fact, a reference to the King of Babylon, who was compared to the morning star. Others point out that the story of Helel, a Canaanite deity, was very similar to the later story of Satan (Cf. Helel). Fundamentalist Christians have mythologized Lucifer as a rebellious angel who fell from grace and took the name Satan. When you read early Wiccan texts such as The Alex Sanders Lectures that mention Lucifer, it is clear that the name Lucifer is being used to represent a Lord of Death or Shadows such as the Greek God Hades or the Roman God Pluto, not the Devil.(43)

Brown continues:

'But that is not the only example. In Mastering Witchcraft: A Practical Guide for Witches Paul Huson makes this statement - "This is a beginner's guide to practical witchcraft, revealing the techniques and secret workings of those who practice the black arts. It presents the first steps to becoming a witchIt answers all the basic questions about spells, magical recipes, rituals, divination, covens, curses, apparatus, how to develop one's power, etc. From reciting the Lord's Prayer backward throughdetails for spells to arouse lustattain vengeance " Speaking of vengeance, consider this ritual of wrath "a conjuration of the Horned One" recorded on page 186 - "I conjure thee by Barabbas, by Satanas, by the devil cursed be! I summon thee by Barabbas, by Satanas by the devil conjured be! By the underworld itself" Need I note that Barabbas and Satanas are references to the devil who is mentioned? Again, we see the attempt by modern witches to deny the truth." (44)

It is Brown who is covering up facts here. Paul Huson is not a Wiccan. The complete title of Huson's book is Mastering Witchcraft: A Practical Guide For Witches, Warlocks, and Covens. Note how Brown has deleted the final three words to make the title of Huson's book seem more like that of a Wiccan author: Huson uses terms like "warlock" that no Wiccan would use. The titles of some of Huson's other books give you a clearer idea of where he is coming from: The Coffee Table Book of Witchcraft and Demonology and The Devil's Picturebook: The Compleat Guide to Tarot Cards, Their Origins and Their Usage. Mastering Witchcraft incorporates a lot of the Inquisitional nonsense about Witchcraft including the Black Mass and describes how to use magick for vengeance and spite. These are direct violations of the Wiccan Rede ("Do whatever you will so long as it harms none"). Mastering Witchcraft contains instructions on how to invoke demons, which is not a Wiccans practice. In Mastering Witchcraft, Huson refers to Cernunos as the Devil or Satan. Barabbas is a name that Huson seems to have dreamed up on his own: It doesn't appear in any of the grimoires of Ceremonial Magick that I have collected over the last 33 years. Huson got the name Satanas from the original Greek transliteration of the Hebrew word "ShTN" meaning "adversary" or "accuser". The Greek term Satanas led to the modern English transliteration "Satan" used in English speaking countries today. In other words, Mastering Witchcraft is a book of Satanic magick and Huson is using the term witchcraft to refer to magick, not Wicca.

Brown thinks that he has scored a point by pointing out that the inverted pentagram is used as a symbol of the second degree in Gardnerian (he spells this "Gardinarian"(45)) and Alexandrian Wicca. Brown insists that this is proof that Wiccans are Satanists. This is, as you have seen from examples elsewhere in this series, a very common tactic of our detractors: Claim that all symbols have only one meaning each. In fact the opposite is true. What this really proves is that many different organizations can use the same symbol to mean entirely different things.

Brown continues:

"On numerous occasions I have been told by witches that the Wiccan Rede ("An it harm none, do what ye will") and the threefold law (evil directed at another will return 3 fold upon the perpetrator) hinders witches from directing magic spells or other negative actions against anyone. That just is not true! For instance, famous witch Sybil Leek published a book called the Book of Curses. Earlier in this article I mentioned Paul Huson's book Mastering Witchcraft. In it, "full details are given for spells toattain vengeance." Cursing and vengeance are not good any way you look at it. This is just another attempt to mask the truth."(46)

I already discussed Huson's books. Sybil Leek did indeed write Sybil Leek's Book of Curses (Prentice Hall, 1975, now long out of print), which was a book about how to deal with curses and how to perform blessings. Note how Brown reminds you of the content of Huson's book but doesn't elaborate about the contents of Leek's. If he had read Leek's The Complete Book of Witchcraft, he would have noted that Leek stated: "A black magician gets a kick out of using the forces destructively; a member of Wicca is more interested in using the forces for healing, or helping someone else find a harmonious way through life."(47)

Brown then reveals his homophobia and discomfort with the sexual nature of fertility religions in the following statements:

"Witches are not the wholesome, family oriented people they claim to be. Doreen Irvine, a practicing witch for many years, said, many 'witches were lesbians and homosexuals.' And she's right. I have a poster, letter and application in my files for, as they called it, 'FAGGOT WITCH CAMP.' The letter advertised the 'second annual FAGGOT WITCH CAMP, August 26-30, 1991.' This event was held at Wyalusing State Park in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. According to the letter, 'Our purpose in organizing this event is to gather with like-minded queer men and to explore our unique perspectives and experiences as faggot witches.' This queer event was even announced in the witch publication Circle Network News; Spring 1991..."(48)

"...Speaking of sexual perversion I also have in my files a copy of a witchcraft publication that states that a well known east coast witch 'transitioned' from male to female on Samhain, October 31. What that means is that the person was born a biological male but had his sex organs surgically removed and altered to appear to be female. That IS perversion! In fact, another noted witch who has authored a best selling book on witchcraft under a female name, was born a biological male."(49)

I mentioned Doreen Irvine earlier in this series in my article about Jeremiah Films. Irvine is a person claiming to be a former Satanic High Priestess and Witch that lectures for Maureen Davies's Reachout Trust (which we will discuss in a later article). It is true that some Wiccans are gay. This does not make them "unwholesome" or mean that they are not "family people" as Brown is suggesting here. Obviously the organizers of the Faggot Witch Camp chose a title like this for their event to wave a red flag in the face of people like Brown. Obviously they succeeded in getting Brown's attention.

Brown continues:

"Witchcraft is a perverted sex oriented cult. According to the book, What Witches Do, 'witchcraft has always been a fertility religion' and the orgy was a part of the Craft 'giving the plainer girls a chance.' Gardinarian [sic] witch Patricia C. Crowther describes modern day witch orgies this way - 'The motives of the modern witches are often thought to be questionable, and certainly a considerable element of sexuality is present at many meetingsThe nudity of the coven, the frantic dancing, the incense and the slightly illicit atmosphere contribute to thisThe binding and whipping of new initiants for 'purification' purposes, for instance, is highly titillating for those with sado-masochistic tendencieswhile 'the five-fold kiss' bestowed by the high priest or priestess on the feet, knees, genitals, breasts and lips of the new members speaks for itself. The 'Great Rite,' performed at certain ceremonies and consisting of token or actual sexual intercourseis justified on the grounds that Wicca is, after all, a fertility cult. Only the high priest may initiate a female member, while the high priestess initiates the males.'"(50)

What the reader of Brown's article wouldn't know is that Brown has deleted two and a half paragraphs between Farrar's first sentence about Wicca always having been a fertility religion and the comment about plain girls. Farrar's complete passage in What Witches Do actually reads:

"Witchcraft has always been a fertility religion. In earlier, earthier days when fertility of man, beast and field was a plain matter of survival, activities to bring it about were concerned more with necessity than with taste or morals. Today, when technology determines agricultural fertility, and human over-population is a major problem and individual childlessness a minor (though sometimes distressing) one, spiritual fertility becomes more important to religion than physical.

"To some people, that may sound like a hypocritical rationalization, or in plainer works, a nice excuse for an orgy; but anyone who is looking for an orgy will be wasting his time in a genuine Wiccan coven. He would do better to find some like-minded friends, and some drink, and throw a party.

"The orgy used to exist in the Craft, certainly- when the coven worked itself up with dancing under the moon and then paired off into the woods. Its fertility purpose was direct; it offered periodic release from a harsh round of existence; and it had the admirable effect of giving the plainer girls a chance. Any girl who became pregnant could be sure of a 'handfasting'- if necessary enforced by the coven, because some at least would have seen who it was she disappeared into the woods with. Such rough-and-ready methods are no longer necessary."(51)

This gives quite a different message to the immorality that Brown is accusing us of here. Farrar's understanding of the history of Beltaine customs is more or less correct, but the assumption that Wiccan covens existed in ancient times is now known to be a false assumption based on the works of people like Margaret Murray.

Brown's deletion of the passages to modify the message of Farrar's words colors the similarly edited passage by Crowther that Brown cites afterwards. If Brown had read Crowther's Lid Off The Cauldron, he would have noted that she had very definite opinions on this subject:

"Today we are seeing the effects of repression caused by puritanical thinking and behavior. Don't let us deceive ourselves; this is the root cause behind the so-called permissive society. The people who are at the back of pornography, sadism and violence of every description, are the end-product of generations of repression. Both forms of thinking are equally bad. It is only when we come to the realization that sex is a natural function, not divorced or different from any other bodily activity, that we shall see any improvement in our spiritual evolution."(52)

(Continued... Click HERE for page IV)






ABOUT...

Kerr Cuhulain


Location: Surrey, British Columbia

Website: http://www.officersofavalon.com

Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

Email Kerr: cuhulain@telus.net

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