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Article Specs

VxAcct: 230739

Article ID: 4712

Section: whs

Age Group: Adult

Posted: September 23rd. 2002

Views: 14215

Spiritual Counterfeits [1]

by Kerr Cuhulain

Ed Note 9.26.2002: We launched this article on 9.23.2002, a few days later Kerr found himself conversing with Jack Roper (in email) and has updated this piece to reflect the results of those conversations.

By now you've probably noticed how many of the people that I have written about in the Witch Hunts series use each other as resources to build up each others urban legends about Satanism. Yet some organizations specialize in acting as "misinformation resources," especially for law enforcement agencies.

One such organization supplying misinformation to law enforcement is Christian Apologetics: Research And Information Service (CARIS), based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This is an organization founded and directed by Jack M Roper, who lists himself in CARIS literature as a "researcher." It is associated with Writeway Literary Associates (whom I discussed earlier in the article on Michael Warnke). CARIS bills itself as "a research organization designed to assist individuals, churches, educational institutions and law enforcement in understanding the problems of cults and the occult."

On his web site, Roper describes his qualifications as follows:

"Technical Advisor for Law Enforcement Subculture Researcher Investigative Researcher Photo Journalism Registered Nurse

"Jack is a senior researcher with the Milwaukee-based C.A.R.I.S. cult research organization which is designed to assist individuals, educational institutions, writers, media, counselors, churches, and law enforcement in understanding the growing problem of cults and the occult. C.A.R.I.S was founded in 1975 in California.

"The cult estimation count in America varies from 2,000 - 5,000 various groups. The drug subculture and mystical movement of the 1960's opened up Pandora's box to serious cultural changes in our society today. This led to individualistic morality and belief crimes ranging from the Charles Manson homicidal pack of the 60's to the "Heaven's Gate" UFO suicidal cult of the 90's.

"A growing movement today that can not be ignored is the uncivilized heavy metal Gothic-twist music of Marilyn Manson who has had numerous sold-out concerts. Both Charles and Marilyn are living inferno-cult heroes of today. The New York Times Editorial Department printed Roper's letter expressing concern about the music industry (11/15/96).

"Roper has been in the field of cult/occult research and photography for 20 years. In the past he was a technical advisor on the occult for Calibre Press, an internationally recognized police training organization based in North Brook, Illinois. Calibre Press produced the award winning law enforcement video Surviving Edged Weapons which won six major film awards including "Best Picture of the Year" by the American Correctional Association. Roper was also a photo resource for the video Cults: Saying No Under Pressure produced by the International Cult Education Program in New York City. This video was narrated by actor Charlton Heston. Jack's photo works have been used on the front cover of the Minnesota Police Chief Magazine (Sept. 1989) as well as for many other cult journalism works.

"The Wisconsin Sheriffs and Deputy Sheriffs Association had Roper train officers at their annual summer training conference in 1991. He was also an instructor on the subculture in September 1995 at the International Association of Women Police Annual Training Conference. He is an associate member of the Midwest Gang Investigators Association.

"He has been on national TV talk shows such as Oprah Winfrey. Roper also assisted some of the families in the triple homicide case of West Memphis, Arkansas where three 8 year old boys were murdered. There were occult overtones that surrounded this case, and it soon became infamous as President Clinton sent his condolences to the victims' families. The leader of the West Memphis satanic cult that was involved in the boys' deaths is now on Death Row in Arkansas, while the other two teenagers are receiving life imprisonment.

"Roper spoke at the first National Conference on Crimes Against Children in Washington, D.C. in 1993. The main speakers were former U.S. Attorney General Edwin Messe and California Senator Newton Russell. Roper's conference topic was 'Historical Ritual Human Sacrifice in Early Paganism.'

"The Paganization of America video is authored by Roper. This video explores the youth and adult subculture arena, and illustrates a vast amount of occultic paraphernalia and cases.

"Jack was also a major photo resource for the hardbound 400-page contemporary Dictionary of Cults, Sects, Religions & the Occult (Harper-Collins/Zondervan). His recent color photography work was published in the text book titled The Challenge of the Cults and New Religions by Ron Rhodes (Zondervan Publishers, Hard bound 400 pages). He has produced three professional occult investigation slide-training series that have been obtained by State and Federal agencies as well as various schools.

"Back in 1979 he received the Outstanding Young Men of America award. Over the years Jack has worked in emergency (EMT) and formerly worked for the Milwaukee County Sheriff's Department as a Registered Nurse in Booking and Maximum Psych Security. Jack is a member of the Photographic Society of America.(1)

In the introduction to his Occult Investigation Slide Training Series, Roper says that he "graduated from the Silva Mind Control course in 1971, was a founding member of the Wisconsin Society for Psychical Research, and was initiated into yoga in 1972 in Switzerland by Swami Bua Ji, head of the Yoga Health Department for the Government of India."(2) Roper goes on to say that he is "a graduate of the Moody Bible Institute".(3)

Roper recommended the following books at a Satanism Symposium sponsored by evangelist Bob Larson on November 4, 1989: The Ultimate Evil by Maury Terry, The Satan Hunter by Tom Wedge, Cults That Kill by Larry Kahaner, Satanism, The Seduction of America's Youth by Bob Larson, Like Lambs to the Slaughter and The Beautiful Side of Evil by Johanna Michaelson, The Devil's Web by Pat Pulling, The Edge of Evil by Jerry Johnston, a volume on the history of human sacrifice by Neville Drury, and William Bainbridge's Satan's Power, which describes the Process Church of Final Judgement.

The list of resources that Roper recommends on his web site gives you an even clearer idea of what his philosophy is. The list includes:
  • Answers in Action. This evangelical Christian organization, founded by Bob & Gretchen Passantino, appears elsewhere in this series.


  • Apologetics Information Ministry (AIM). AIM's director is Craig Hawkins, considered by Roper and others to be an expert in Christian Apologetics, Paganism and Witchcraft. Hawkins is the author of Witchcraft: Exploring the World of Wicca and Goddess Worship, Witchcraft and Neo-Paganism.


  • Visions Unlimited Consultants. The director, Tony Kail, researches "cults, the occult and deviant groups."


  • Christian Answers for the New Age (C.A.N.A.). This organization is run by a former astrologer turned Christian: Marcia Montenegro.


  • Christian Research Institute-International (CRI). An organization providing information on "cults, mysticism and the occult" to Christian groups. They produce the "Bible Answer Man" radio program.


  • Cornerstone Apologetics Research Team. Research coordinator: Eric Pement. Researches "cults, mysticism and the occult" and supplies information on Satanic Ritual Abuse.


  • Frank Dobbins, S. Wells Williams & Isaac Hall. These individuals are the authors of the book False Gods or the Idol Worship of the World. The title is self explanatory.


  • Evangelical Ministries To New Religions. Director Bob Waldrep studies "cults, mysticism and the occult."


  • Glory Ministries. This is the Texas ministry of David Benoit, whose name has come up elsewhere in this series. Benoit has a weekday 3 hour radio program in Dallas and is the author of Fourteen Things Witches Hope Parents Never Find Out and The Battleplan For The Battlefield.


  • Alexander Hislop. We've seen Hislop's anti-Catholic book The Two Babylons cited time and time again as a reference in my Witch Hunts series. Basically Hislop contends that all religions other than Christianity are variations of a "Mystery Babylon" religion.


  • Jeremiah Films. I discussed Jeremiah films in an earlier article in this series.


  • John Ankerberg Show. A Christian Apologetics program. The director is John Ankerberg and his senior research assistant is John Weldon.
  • Kjos, Berit. A fundamentalist Christian author whose name has appeared elsewhere in this series. His books include Brave New Schools and A Twist of Faith.


  • Logos Communications. This is the ministry of David Brown, whom we discussed in an earlier article in this series.


  • Al Meniconi. An evangelist who preaches that Heavy Metal music causes Satanism.


  • Midwest Christian Outreach. Director: Don Veinot. Supplies information with a Christian perspective on "cults, mysticism and the occult."


  • M.O.M.M.Y. (Mothers of Murdered/Missing Youngsters). This organization was founded by Pamela M. Hobbs, mother of Steve Branch. They "provide educational seminars on Cults and the Occult to make the public aware of the dangers our children face in the world we live in."

  • New England Institute of Religion. Director: Robert Pardon. Provides information on "cults, mysticism and the occult."


  • Dr Norman Geisler of the Southern Evangelical Seminary, a Christian apologist.


  • Personal Freedom Outreach. Director: Kurt Goedelman. This organization was prominent in my earlier article on Tom Sanguinet.


  • Dr Ravi Zacharias of Ravi Zacharias International: A Christian Apologist.


  • Rock Ministries. Director: Jeff Godwin. Another person trying to convince the public that Heavy Metal music causes Satanism.


  • Samantha Smith, A Christian activist that opposes environmentalism and "eco-Paganism." She produced a video, Goddess Earth, and a book, Trojan Horse.


  • The Sanctuary. Director David Hart preaches that Gothic Music is a recruiting scheme for Satan.


  • Spiritual Counterfeits Project. Director of Research: Brooks Alexander. As the title suggests, Alexander spends his time trying to prove that all religions other than his brand of Christianity are "counterfeit" religions. SCP has appeared elsewhere in this series and will be discussed in detail in part two of this article.


  • Steve and Linda Taylor. "These parents lost their son after his involvement with the occult," Roper explains, "At the age of 13 he got involved with Satanism. When he was 16 years old he committed suicide. His story is covered in the video The Paganization of America."(4)


  • The Berean Call. Director: T.A. McMahon. Dave Hunt, author of The Occult Invasion, is a speaker for this organization.


  • Truth Seekers. Director: Dr. Robert Morey. This is an anti-Islamic organization.

  • Utah Lighthouse Ministry. Director: Sandra Tanner. An anti-Mormon ministry.


  • Watchman Fellowship. Director: Craig Branch. This organization has appeared elsewhere in this series and will be the subject of a later article.


  • Witness,Inc. Director: Duane Magnani. An anti-Jehovah's Witness group.


Roper also lists several Law Enforcement Resources on his web site:
  • Calibre Press. This organization has produced some excellent safety training programs called "Street Survival Seminars" and "Tactical Edge Seminars" for police officers over the years. However, for a while they were disseminating the sort of information on the occult put out by the likes of Jack Roper as part of these courses.


  • Midwest Gang Investigators Association. Roper is "an associate member of the Midwest Gang Investigators Association."(5) Another cop who disseminates misinformation about the occult, Jerry Simandl, is also active in this organization.


  • Dan Korem. Korem is the author of the book Suburban Gangs: The Affluent Rebels. Korem is an investigative journalist. IN Suburban Gangs, Koren discusses "occult gangs" and also the "claims of Satanic ritual abuse victims." Korem was a speaker at the 1995 annual International Association of Women Police conference with Roper. Korem was also the producer of the video Psychic Confession.


Roper's web site includes a section called "Witchcraft Power" in which he makes the following comments:

"Within the professional community some are providing favourable reports within the Witchcraft-Wicca community [sic]. One past example was at Birmingham Southern College in Birmingham, Alabama. The school newspaper had this to say." Dr. Nancy Campbell, Associate Professor of Psychology, will be presenting a Dean's Forum lecture about Wicca, the religion of witches, on November 14...' This is not a speech to encourage people to join Wicca or to participate in witchcraft. It is simply a presentation of a study in which I participated earlier this year,' stated Campbell." (B.S.C Newspaper November 7,1991).

"Campbell's presentation about Wicca was given in a favourable light. After I sat their listening to Dr. Campbell it was then my turn to show the other side about the other side [sic]. I came forward with a stack of documentation. There is a dark and esoteric side to Wicca and some of this is covered in [Craig] Hawkins' book...and also in this web site."(6)

Roper's main objection to Campbell's presentation seems to be that she should dare to present Wicca in a favorable light. Roper continues:

"In November 1998 I spoke at a liberal college on the occult. After my presentation a Wiccan came up to me about her 5 year commitment to her religion as a solitary witch. She was sincere. I asked about her familiar spirit but she did not want to share with me about her "spirit guide" encounter. There is a supernatural and esoteric element within witchcraft that is often avoided in conversation by the witches when speaking to a cowan (unbeliever a person who is not a witch). This witch e-mailed me a pantheistic centered letter. In my e-mail reply I asked her again about her familiar spirit. She totally ignored my question again. There is another dimension of reality that has the ability to mislead the human mind. That is where the familiar spirit comes in-literally [emphasis in original]."(7)

Roper assumes that because this person is Wiccan she must have a familiar spirit. This is straight out of the Malleus Malificarum of the Inquisition. It seems that whether this Wiccan denies having a familiar or ignores his question, Roper will interpret this as unwillingness to admit the existence of such a creature. Roper continues:

"One resource that shows Lucifer's connection with witchcraft is discussed in the book Witches by T.C. Lethbridge (Citadel Press 1968). The late Lethbridge, a prominent parapsychologist, was a scholar in his days. He was an archaeologist and for thirty years Director of Excavations for the Cambridge University Antiquarian Society and the University Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology. Lethbridge states in his scholarly book ,The great deity who made the universe and ordered the lives of men was female. She was Diana who, to the Greek world, was known as Artemis. Diana was at first invisible, but she created light in the form of a male consort, Lucifer. He was represented by the sun, the greatest light known to men. Diana, as Queen of heaven and darkness, was represented by the greatest object in the night sky, the moon. A child of the union of Light and Darkness was Magic and was known as Aradia. Aradia was sent to earth to teach this art to mankind" (page 13-14-emphasis [Roper's]). Lethbridge also states the goddess Diana's lover was Pan, the nature god (page 34) and that Lucifer who represented the Sun was turned out of Paradise(page 6). "Furthermore, it seems reasonable to say that Lucifer, the light-bearer, is Baal' (page 36). Baal was a sun god associated with human sacrifice(see National Geographic Magazine August 1974, pages 166-167). In witchcraft, Satan is considered to be a Christian invention and many witches do not recognize the fall of Lucifer, unless they are into black witch craft (black magick)."(8)

Note how Roper highlights the sections pertaining to darkness and to Pan in his passage. Note also how Roper is pasting together bits of information from various different sources. Roper adds his own interpretation of Baal based on a National Geographic magazine. Baal was a pre-Biblical Phoenician vegetation and storm God whose name translates as "lord." Baal is mentioned many times in the Old Testament, an example being Judges 2:13: "And they forsook the Lord, and served Baal and Ashtaroth." In some places in the Bible Baal has become a demon. In other instances the Bible uses the name Baal simply as a synonym for "Lord", as in the name Baal zebub ("Lord of the Flies"). Nowhere in the Bible are Baal and Lucifer described at the same entity. Lucifer does not appear in Greek or Roman mythology either. The story that Lethbridge is relating here is a variation on the story found in Aradia: Gospel of the Witches by lawyer and soldier of fortune Charles Geoffrey Leland. Aradia, written by Leland in 1899, purports to be a description of traditional Tuscan Witchcraft as described to him by a Witch named Maddelena and a translation of her "gospel," which he named "Vangelo." Aradia bears a striking resemblance to Michelet's earlier book La Sorciere (whose English translation is Satanism and Witchcraft).

Originally the name of the Goddess in both Leland's and Michelet's books was Herodias. Michelet had accepted the theory advanced by Jarcke, Mone, Murray, and others that there had been a large, organized "Witch cult" or Pagan religion that was spread across Western Europe, under a Christian ruling class. Michelet believed that the name of the Goddess of this ancient religion was Herodias. This happens to be the name of a very wicked woman who appears in Matthew 14:3, 14:6; Mark 6:17, 6:19; and Luke 3:19 in the New Testament of the Bible.

In the tenth century, the Church issued the Canon Episcopi, which claimed that literal belief in witchcraft was folly because it was an illusion inspired by Satan. The Canon Episcopi was re-enacted several times until the Council of Treves in 1310. The Canon Episcopi gave the name Herodias as the name of the leader of the "Wild Hunt," the nocturnal procession of the Goddess of the Hunt and her retinue. Michelet probably thought that this was based on factual accounts, rather than the speculation of Church theologians. Leland borrowed the name Herodias from Michelet. Once rendered into Italian, "Herodias" became "Aradia." The first problem with Leland's allegations is that no historian or folklorist has found any evidence of the Tuscan Witch cult described by Leland, nor any evidence of a goddess named Aradia. Leland's original use of the name Herodias clearly shows that he was borrowing from Michelet or the Canon Episcopi or the Bible. The second difficulty is that the language of the "Vangelo," the "Witch Gospel" allegedly recovered by Leland, is unmistakably nineteenth century, and not fourteenth century as Leland suggests.

Roper continues:

"One of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World was the Temple of Diana which had a statue of the Black Diana and in her was planted a "magical stone". She is one of the most important goddesses within Witchcraft and Paganism today [emphasis Roper's]."(9)

Note how Roper is once again emphasizing the "black" part of this passage. Roper continues:

"Another interesting footnote discussing Diana's lover Pan was found in the classic book The Greek Myth by Dr. Robert Graves (Penguin Books 1960, page 102). Graves was the late Professor of English Literature at Cairo University. He was also a witch who rejected Judaeo-Christianity(see TIME Magazine February 7,1983 page 80 with picture). Graves wrote in The Greek Myth about the false god Pan "Pan, whose name is usually derived from paein, ' to pasture', stands for the 'devil', or 'upright man', of the Arcadian fertility cult, which closely resembled the witch cult of North-western Europe."(10)

The actual title of Graves's work was The Greek Myths (plural). It is a two volume set. Roper has correctly quoted Graves (from volume one, though Roper doesn't indicate this). However, note how Roper refers to Pan as a "false god" here. Graves bought in to the theory of Margaret Murray that there was a "Witch Cult" in Western Europe. It was this that inspired Robert Graves to write The White Goddess, which was instrumental in forming what came to be modern Wicca. We now know Murray's theories of the existence of such a cult to be incorrect. However, if Roper had really read all of The Greek Myths and taken this excerpt in context, he would have realized that Graves was making it quite clear that he wasn't referring to the Christian Devil in this reference to Pan. Roper tries to capitalize on his interpretation of Pan as he continues:

"In the large classic volume on Pagan mythology Larousse's World of Mythology, Pan is classified as a "Nature demon" and rightly so. His emblem is the phallus according to Funk & Wagnalls Standard Dictionary of Folklore, Mythology and Legend. Pan is a "god of play and lust" within Paganism, Satanism and Witchcraft today. He has been repeatedly discussed within Pagan periodical [sic]."

It seems that Roper's primary objection to Pan and thus Paganism is that it is a fertility religion in which sex is not considered to be immoral. A variation of this theme comes up again in Roper's reference section, where he lists Philippe Borgeaud's The Cult of Pan In Ancient Greece. Roper states:

"Dr. Borgeaud is Professor of History of Religions at the University of Geneva. Pan is a horned goat god in nature worship and a symbol of fertility. The author writes about one of the salient features of Pan. 'Is Pan not 'guilty' of various pederastic excesses ? Unquestionably he is attracted to young men. We cannot exclude the possibility that he went so far as to use force.' (page 73). A vase of Pan is located at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. A statue head of Pan is located at the British Museum and is pictured in the Dictionary of Cults, Sects, Religions and the Occult... The horn god Pan is pictured on the front cover of the pagan Green Egg magazine hugging a little boy who also has horns. (Issue Vol. 28 #108).See also front cover of Green Egg (Vol. 27 #104)."

Note how Roper is again pasting together excerpts about Pan from various sources into one paragraph. The inference that Roper appears to be making here is that Pan represents pedophilia.

Roper also quotes from Sociology professor Marcello Truzzi's chapter on "Modern Witchcraft" from the text Religious Movements in Contemporary America:(11)

"'In general, ascertaining the source of legitimacy in witchcraft groups is very difficult, especially since almost all claim ancient, traditional origins. However, intensive investigation usually reveals that the group's secret sources are not as claimed. Thus, for example, many of the leading witches in the United States and England claim authority through alleged initiations via the coven on the Isle of man headed by the late Gerald Gardner [Father of Modern Wicca-witchcraft], probably the most important figure in the promotion of the contemporary revival of interest in witchcraft as a religion. Yet there is much evidence suggesting that Gardner concocted most of his rituals and legends from his own fertile imagination and that the promoted witchcraft for economic and sexual reasons...Since so many witches are the result of the diffusion of Gardner's exportations, any coven whose origin can not be traced prior to 1950 should be highly suspect in regard to its claim of earlier, traditional roots' (page 636 emphasis [Roper's])."(12)

This is an attempt by Roper to discredit Wicca by claiming that it isn't as old as his religion is. This is a logical fallacy. Truth is truth. It doesn't matter how long ago you found it. All religions (including Roper's) were created by humans. Some of the practices that have been incorporated into modern Wicca are not as old as Gardner and his peers once thought them to be, but this does not make what he created invalid.

[continued... Click HERE for page 2]






ABOUT...

Kerr Cuhulain


Location: Surrey, British Columbia

Website: http://www.officersofavalon.com

Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

Email Kerr: cuhulain@telus.net

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