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Article Specs

VxAcct: 230739

Article ID: 4756

Section: whs

Age Group: Adult

Posted: October 28th. 2002

Views: 7787

Satan's Fantasies [7]

by Kerr Cuhulain

Phillips offers the most unbelievable and complicated arguments involving the movie Gremlins. In the movie Gremlins the people are told not to let the creatures called Mogwai near water. This turns them into mischievous Gremlins. Phillips states:

"Because these devilish-looking creatures are not promoting the kingdom of God, the rules are obvious. Jesus says He is the Living Water and the Light of the World. It is also true that demons run away when faced with the power of Jesus. Jesus is the Living Water, and when we drink from the River of Life, we thirst no more. Therefore, any creature promoting the work of Satan would be certain to stay away from water."(50)

Phillips demonstrates very elaborate mental gymnastics and an active imagination here. Phillips must have thought long and hard to come up with this one.

Obviously Phillips' book Turmoil in the Toybox is a good example of religious intolerance and Christian fanaticism and little else.

Phillips, as he mentioned in his letter has also coauthored a book: Halloween and Satanism. Joan Hake Robie, the president of Starburst Publishers in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, was his coauthor. Starburst Publications was the publisher of Turmoil in the Toybox. Robie has made many TV talk show appearances to speak about her Satanic conspiracy beliefs.

In Halloween and Satanism, Phillips states that "fear is not of God"(51) and that "fear leads to the Occult."(52) Yet Phillips and Robie are obviously trying to use fear themselves to discourage interest in what they consider the occult. Phillips states: "Those who disregard God's warning and make contact with occult spirits ride certain terrible repercussions in the form of misery, sickness, insanity, and sometimes early death."(53) Remember how Phillips was attributing his illnesses and mishaps to Satan earlier?

Phillips makes an ominous statement that makes it look like he supports the idea of "Witch Hunts":

"From 1575 to the 1700s many people were burned at the stake for real or suspected involvement in witchcraft. Yet today witchcraft has gained acceptability by many people."(54)

Phillips encourages the usual stereotypes of Witches, showing a picture of the witch from the animated Walt Disney classic "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves" as an example in his book.(55) This is typical of the illustrations in this book, many of which were taken from Inquisitional woodcuts and drawings, horror movies, and comics.

What follows this is a very slanted description and history of Witchcraft. Phillips mixes knowledge of actual Wiccan festival dates and practices with the usual mythical propaganda about the witches of the "MacBeth" variety. In fact, he even quotes the recipe of the second weird sister from Shakespeare's play "MacBeth,"(56) acting as if it is a real formula, and not Shakespeare's invention. Phillips states: "The main feature of the witches Sabbats was the Black Mass."(57) This is Inquisitional fantasy, not an historical fact. Phillips also quotes Inquisitor Paulus Grillandus:

"Those witches who have solemnly devoted themselves to the Devil's service, worship him in a particular manner with ceremonial sacrifices, which they offer to the Devil, imitating in all respects the worship of almighty God, with vestements, lights, and every other ritual observance, so that they worship him and praise him, just as we worship the true God".(58)

More Inquisitional fantasies. To this Phillips adds his own erroneous assumptions: "Nudity is prevalent in the worship of Satan. During the initiation ceremony of a witch the initiate lies naked on the altar, is symbolically 'sacrificed' to the sun god (sic)."(59) Wiccans do not perform the Black Mass. No one lies on the altar in any Wiccan ceremony, and no one in Wicca sacrifices to a sun God, or any other God, symbolically or otherwise.

Phillips assumes that since the Christians moved their All Soul's Day to November 1 the earlier Pagan festival was "a celebration of death."(60) I explained earlier in this series that Samhain, Pagan festival that the Church sought to replace by moving the Feast of All Soul's to November 1, was a remembrance of the dear departed, not a celebration of death.

Phillips also comes out with some outrageous statements regarding the festival of Samhain, claiming that "the Name of the Celtic sun god was Muck Olla"(61) and that "Samhain" was the name of the "lord of the dead"(62). I pointed out earlier in this series that Samhain was a minor Celtic cattle deity, giving you the actual names of the Celtic Gods of the Sun and Death. Muck Olla is often misidentified as a Sun God in books by authors like Phillips and Robie. Thorough research will reveal that no such Sun God ever existed. The Celtic Sun Gods were:

  • "Lugh" for the Irish. Also known as "Lugh Lamhfada" (which means the "Lugh the long handed" or the "Lugh far-shooter"), or "Lugh Samhioldanach" (which means "Lugh who is equally skilled in all the arts")
  • "Lleu" or "Llew" for the Welsh (also known as "Lleu Llaw Gyffes" which means "Lleu strong hand").
  • "Bel" or "Belenus" for the British and Gauls. The word "bel" means "bright" or "brilliant".

Muck Olla is, in fact, a legendary boar of enormous size who was said to have been slain by one of the Geraldines in County Cork in Ireland. At Ballycotton in County Cork a procession was led by a man called the Lair Bhan, who was dressed in a white sheet and who carried or wore a mask like a mare's skull. Instead of saying "Trick or Treat" as children nowadays do in North America, they would demand gifts in the name of Muck Olla.

No one can say precisely how old this custom is, but the boar (or pig) was a sacred animal to the Celts, providing meat for the feasts of the Otherworld or Summerland. A sow is the symbol of the Goddess Cerridwen. A mare was the symbol of the Goddess Epona or Rhiannon. So Muck Olla, if related to a deity at all, is more likely to be related to a Goddess, rather than any God.

In Wales, people used to light bonfires on hill tops at Samhain. They would roast potatoes and apples to eat, dance and sing, and when the fire burned down, leap over it. As the flames burned down the celebrants would suddenly dash off down the hill, crying: "May the tailless Black Sow take the hindmost!" This was a reference to the "hwch ddu gwta", the tailless Black Sow that was a symbol of Cerridwen in her crone aspect.

Phillips continues by demonstrating his total misunderstanding of Samhain when he states: "An alternative to a Halloween party might be to have a 'Harvest Party'."(63) This is precisely what Samhain was to the ancient Celts: A celebration of the end of the harvest. Of course, Phillips wants the people at his "Harvest Party" to dress up as "Bible characters."(64) Phillips suggests that during his party "parents may wish to have a Prayer Meeting"(65) which should center around "praying for the youth as well as rebuking Satan and the witches in the area."(66) Phillips suggests renaming this day "Holy-ween"(67) and using it to "bring other youths to a saving knowledge of Jesus Christ."(68) Phillips continues: "What could be more crushing a blow to Satan than to have others won to Jesus on Satan's holiday!... Halloween is not just fun and games. It is serious business."(69) Here is that same message again: They're indoctrinating your kids, so come to my party so I can indoctrinate them into my religion instead.

In Halloween and Satanism Phillips and Robie denounce Ouija Boards, Dungeons and Dragons, Tarot cards, Tea leaf reading, Scrying, what they call the "third eye,"(70) Talismans, Palmistry, Necromancy, Ritual Magic, Edgar Cayce, Rosicrucians, Good Luck Charms, Pentagrams and Hex Signs. We've already talked about Dungeons and Dragons. Ouija boards, Tarot cards, Tea leaves, Scrying, and Palmistry are all very benign practices that do not involve Satanism at all.

Phillips and Robie aren't specific about what they mean by the term "third eye." The third eye is an energy point or chakra in systems of Yoga and some Western magical traditions that is between the eyebrows. It is sometimes described as the part of the body that actually is used in divination to see visions. Given that it is included in Phillip's and Robie's list with other terms descriptive of divination, this is probably what they take it to mean. In any case it is not a Satanic term.

Edgar Cayce was a well known psychic, and a devout Christian. The Rosicrucians are a magical lodge whose beliefs are based on Judeo-Christian beliefs. Hex signs, common in some parts of the US such as Pennsylvania, are a Dutch folk custom involving the painting of symbols on houses to bring good fortune, prosperity, protection and other things unrelated to Satanism. Much of the western tradition of Ritual Magic is based on Judeo Christian beliefs. Good luck charms? Not Satanic. The only thing on their list that sounds remotely Satanic is necromancy.

Regarding Tarot cards Phillips states: "Usually the pictures are crude and not very well drawn".(71) It makes me wonder if he has ever really seen a Tarot deck, since most are very elaborate and very beautiful.

Regarding good luck charms Phillips states: "Some objects, particularly rings, bracelets, and other jewelry, which has been given to a person by someone who is involved in witchcraft, will have bondages and/or curses in them."(72) Here we have more Inquisitional nonsense.

Regarding pentagrams Phillips states: "When witches want to talk to demons they often will stand within a pentagram. Then the demon will appear within a hexagram".(73) A hexagram where? Witches don't believe in demons and they practice their craft in circles, not pentagrams. In Occidental Ceremonial Magic, entities such as angels and demons are called by the magician who stands in a circle which may have a pentagram drawn in it, and who uses talismans with pentagrams and/or hexagrams inscribed on them to control these spirits. The spirit supposedly appears in a triangle outside of the circle, not in a hexagram. The grimoires describing these rituals are still in print, but Phillips has obviously not read any of them. Ceremonial magic is not Satanic.

Phillips frequently quotes Pat Pulling and Dr Thomas Radecki, as he did in Turmoil in the Toybox. He quotes Radecki as saying: "...becoming involved in D&D can lead many players into deep involvement with the occult and Satan worship,"(74) once again demonstrating Radecki's Christian agenda.

Phillips states that "the only true way that we can expand our creative thinking is to establish and cultivate a relationship with God."(75) Any other form of imaginative thought Phillips and Robie discourage. Phillips states: "Christ teaches that fantasy can be evil."(76) He also states that playing Dungeons and Dragons causes the player to be unable to separate fantasy from reality, as he did in his other book. Yet Phillips quotes "ritual" from MacBeth and from D&D manuals as well as cartoons in this book as if they were real, demonstrating that he cannot separate fantasy from reality himself.

Phillips lists the following as the "twelve forbidden practices"(77): Enchantments, witchcraft, sorcery, divination, wizardry, necromancy, "charm" (sic), star gazing/astrology, soothsaying, prognostication, observing times, and magic.

Phillips defines witchcraft here as "The practice of dealing with evil spirits, the use of sorcery or magic."(78) If Phillips is referring to Wicca here he is wrong. Wiccans do not deal with evil spirits. Phillips calls Sorcery "pharmaika."(79) What he is obviously referring to here (although he misspells the term) is the Greek word "pharmakeuein" ("to practice sorcery" or "to use medicine"). "Observing times" Phillips defines as "astrology"(80) which seems to be redundant since astrology is already on his list. Another redundant term is "Magic," which he defines as "witchcraft," which is also already on his list.

One of the best examples of subtle anti-Semitism I have seen in a long time is to be found in Halloween and Satanism. On page 117 Phillips and Robie show a poster of a leering face with a star of David on its forehead, with the caption "Satanic symbol." The wording on this poster is in the Dutch language and is not translated for the reader. It is in fact a World War II Nazi poster for the propaganda film "The Eternal Jew". This particular poster was for the Dutch language version. The Dutch word "Jood" is close enough to English to be understood, especially since it is immediately above the Mogen David on the poster. Surely Phillips and Robie know what this poster is. There is no association between the Jewish faith and Satanism.

We have seen two examples in this article of people that present themselves as experts on Fantasy Role Playing Games, even though it is obvious that they know little or nothing about their subject. Both are examples of persons denying reality, though one is doing this to overcome guilt and the other is doing it to denounce non-Christian religions and to further his own fundamentalist Christian agenda. Obviously the information that they provide is of little use to the therapist or investigator.






ABOUT...

Kerr Cuhulain


Location: Surrey, British Columbia

Website: http://www.officersofavalon.com

Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

Email Kerr: cuhulain@telus.net

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