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Article Specs

VxAcct: 230739

Article ID: 8557

Section: whs

Age Group: Adult

Posted: July 4th. 2004

Views: 33410

Symbols (G-N)

by Kerr Cuhulain

Goetia:

In Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Rapacki defines the term Goetia as: "A tradition of black magic, including incantations, ceremonies and techniques of sorcery."[132] Goetia was derived from the Greek roots "goeteia" ("magic or jugglery"), "goeteuein" ("to bewitch") and "goes" ("wizard or sorcerer"). While ceremonial magic is sometimes referred to as "Goetic Magic", the term "Goetia" is specifically the title of one of the books forming the grimoire known as The Lesser Key of Solomon, also known as the Lemegeton.

Greater Key of Solomon:

In Anderson's Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, the Key of Solomon is described thus: "Probably the most famous grimoire ever written; some legends hold that it was written by demons and hidden under Solomon's throne. Various versions in different languages survive today."[133] Later in his manual Anderson contradicts himself and defines this as "An area of protection in which rituals and conjuring occur. May have Latin writing or symbols written inside of it."[134]

The Greater Key of Solomon was also known as the Clavicula Salomonis, or The Key of Solomon the King. The Greater Key of Solomon was supposed to have been written by King Solomon (1033-975 BCE), though this is highly unlikely. Right at the beginning of the text of The Greater Key of Solomon, it says that the text was knowledge written down by Solomon which he received from God. Nowhere in the text does it say that The Greater Key of Solomon was written by demons.

The Greater Key of Solomon was first translated into English in 1889 by S. Liddell MacGregor Mathers. The oldest surviving copy dates back to the 16th century CE and is in the British Museum. Most of the surviving copies are French, and reside in either the Arsenal at Paris or the Bibliotheque National. It is unlikely to have been written before the 14th century CE. The "area of protection" in which magick is performed is a Circle, not a "key of Solomon" as Anderson suggests. He may have got this idea as the Greater Key of Solomon describes several such magic Circles.

Grimoire:

In A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, Mary Ann Herold mispells the term: "Grimorie-- (I have also seen this spelled g-r-i-m-o-i-r-e) book of spells and magickal procedures."[135] The only place that I have ever seen the term "grimorie" is in Herold's awful manual and in a few foreign language or gothic web sites where I am sure that it was a typographical error.

Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual includes Grimoire in its list of "occult terms.[136] Other definitions that I've encountered in occult crime manuals over the years include:
  • "Coven's book of spells; may have curses, names signed in blood, etc. Good evidence if you can locate it; will help track a coven's activities."[137]

  • "Manual of occult magic rituals and spells. Some of the more widely used grimoires are The Black Raven, Eighth to Thirteenth Books of Moses, Enchanted Words of Black Forest, The Genuine Fiery Dragon, The Key of Solomon, The Lesser Key of Solomon, The Little Book of Romanus, The Necronomicon, Saint's Blessing, The Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses, the Spring Book, The Spiritual Shield, and the Testament of Solomon."[138]
A grimoire is a magickal text of the Occidental Ceremonial schools of magick. Several of these "Grimoires" have survived from the Middle Ages. As I mentioned earlier, another name for a Grimoire is "Goetia," which comes from a Greek word meaning "sorcery". Grimoires are basically a collection of magickal customs, recipe books of magickal spells, and directories of names and ranks of various spirit entities that the ceremonial magician may call, along with the signatures or "sigils" of these entities. Grimoires are usually published these days, although the earliest examples came from a time before the printing press and were copied by hand.

Grimoires are typically said to have been written by some great magician or philosopher in the past: The Greater Key of Solomon is possibly the most well known example of this. This was an attempt on the part of the real author to lend the book authority that it did not deserve.

Some of the grimoires listed by Sloat above really are grimoires (The Key of Solomon, The Lesser Key of Solomon, the 6th and 7th Books of Moses, The Testament of Solomon, The 8th to 13th Books of Moses). Others on his list are not. The Black Raven is book two of the Dragon Mage fiction series by writer Katherine Kerr (the first book being The Red Wyvern. I believe that "The Enchanted Words of Black Forest" may be an inept attempt to list another fantasy series, this by author Patricia C. Wrede: The Enchanted Forest Chronicles. I believe that "The Genuine Fiery Dragon" might be a reference to the grimoire called The Red Dragon. Saints Blessings: Wisdom and Guidance Inspired By The World's Most Beloved Saints, is a recent book by Meera Lester which clearly has nothing to do with magic. "The Little Book of Romanus" may be a reference to the Virgilius Romanus, an illustrated book which dates back to Fifth century Ireland which has been kept at the Vatican since the papacy of Sixtus VI (1471-84). It isn't a book of magic either. I searched numerous catalogues and could not find any reference to "The Spring Book" or "The Spiritual Shield"

Hand of Glory:

This piece of European folklore has made its way into several manuals on "occult crime". For example, Westhoelter defines the hand of glory in his General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult: "In witchcraft, a lighted candle positioned between the fingers of a dead person's hand-usually that of a criminal condemned to death".[139]

Hand of Glory is believed to be derived from the French "main de glorie" or "mandrogore" and is likely related to legends concerning the mandrake plant.[140] The earliest mention of it is in texts from the early 18th century. Belief in it persisted as late as 1831 in Ireland. It was a charm that was lit by a thief to ensure that the occupants of the house that he was burglarizing would sleep soundly. Its preparation is described in Secrets Merveilleux de la Magie Naturelle et Cabalistique du Petit Albert (Cologne, 1722) translated by both Grillot DeGivry and Edgar Arthur Waite:

"Take the right hand of a felon who is hanging from a gibbet beside a highway; wrap it in part of a funeral pall and so wrapped squeeze it well [to get out all the blood]. then put it into an earthenware vessel with zimat, nitre, salt, and long peppers, the whole well powdered. Leave it in this vessel for a fortnight, then take it out and expose it to full sunlight during the dog-days until it become quite dry. If the sun is not strong enough put it in an oven heated with fern and vervain. Next make it a kind of candle with the fat of a gibbeted felon, virgin wax, sesame, and ponie, and use the Hand of Glory as a candlestick to hold this candle when lighted."[141]

An example of such a Hand of Glory can be found in the Whitby Museum in North Yorkshire. The legend lives on in Hollywood B movies such as The Wicker Man. Wiccans and other Pagans don't use Hands of Glory.

Hex Symbols:

"Hex signs" are listed as a "Demonic Symbol" on the Madrak's Demonbusters web site. [142] Tom Sanguinet describes the hexagram as a sign that Druids left on people's doorways. John Todd claims that "...When some unfortunate couldn't meet the demands of the Druids, then it was time for the trick. A hex (hexagram) was drawn on the front door..."[143] Tom Wedge includes 7 pages of hex symbols in his manual on "occult crime". In a list of terms borrowed from Ritualistic Crime Consultants in his Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, Sloat defines "hex" as "Hex- Used by 'Hectight' Witches. It is mind controlled [sic]. A Hectight Witch is very powerful and resourceful."[144]

In all the years that I have been involved in Wicca I have never heard of a "Hectight Witch". I strongly suspect, given the numerous spelling mistakes made in this list, that this may be an attempt to guess at the spelling of the name of the Goddess "Hecate." Hecate was a Greek and Roman Goddess of the moon, death and magic, often depicted as having three faces, representing the three phases of the moon (waxing, full and waning). Hecate is an aspect of female divinity often used in Wicca, but there is no tradition of Wicca named for her that I am aware of. It is possible that this misspelled name was taken from the movie Midnight Offerings. About half way through this film actress Marion Ross (playing a "good Witch") proclaims that an evil teenaged "Witch" (played by Melissa Sue Anderson) is a "Hectate Witch" and accuses her of being a follower of Hecate and a devil worshiper.

Hex symbols are not necessarily hexagrams. They are pictorial diagrams placed on structures to ward off evil. The practice originated in Germany and can be found in areas of the United States such as Pennsylvania that were settled by Germans. The word hex comes from the Germanic terms "hexe" (a female "witch") or "hexer" (a male "witch").

Hexagram:

The hexagram is an extremely popular symbol in Satanic conspiracy literature. For example, in Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Rapacki states that "Hexagrams: ... [are] believed among occultists to protect and control demons."[145] In fact, hexagrams were used by Judeo-Christian ceremonial magicians as a protection against demons. In America's Best Kept Secret, Frattarola states that the hexagram "Also referred to as the 'Seal of Solomon' is said to be one of the most powerful symbols in the occult."[146] In Secrets of the Illuminati, Doc Marquis describes the inner hexagram as a demon trap, which he claims was used by Witches to conjure and control demons. In Mystery Mark of the New Age, Texe Marrs claims that "Inside a circle, the Star of David becomes the hexagram, perhaps the most evil sign in the occult world. From the use of the hexagram, we have the word 'hex'. The hexagram is used to put a curse on someone and to call up a demon during a ceremonial rite."[147] In Schemes of Satan, Warnke uses the phrase "Pentagram of Solomon"[148]to label a diagram showing a hexagram surrounded by other symbols on it. This is in fact what is commonly referred to as the"Pentacle of Solomon", not the"pentagram of Solomon".

If Warnke was as knowledgeable as he would have us believe, he would know that a pentagram has five points and a hexagram six. Pentacle here is used in reference to a talisman, not a five pointed star (pentagram). The seal of Solomon, a pentagram, is sometimes referred to as the pentacle of Solomon by persons unfamiliar with the differences between these terms. To confuse matters further, the pentacle of Solomon is sometimes referred to as the Seal of Solomon, as pentacle in this usage is a seal (talisman).

Thomas Carder's ChildCare Action Project/Christian Analysis of American Culture web site claims that "The hexagram has uncondemnable [sic] meaning to the Jews -- it was adopted by them as the Star of David circa their captivity by the Babylonians. The hexagram was also used by the Egyptians as an unholy icon long before the Jews claimed it for holy representation. The hexagram is claimed to be one of the most potent icons for working darkness and magic to call up evil forces for hypnosis and seduction. The hexagram is also known as the Crest of Solomon. The hexagram figures prominently in Tarot and is on the lid of the box for the Tarot deck. It is also the symbol behind putting a "hex" on someone. 'Evil spirits gather in force at the summons of the person working the 'hex'.' The hexagram is believed also to protect from fire, deadly weapons, and dangers while traveling. Such belief is against God's command that we trust only in Him for blessings and protection."[149]

The hexagram appears in the Seal of Solomon: There is no such thing as a "Crest of Solomon". Note how Carder has also linked this with the myths about hex symbols. Carder's comment about Tarot makes it sound as if there is only one Tarot deck. In the Fall 2002 Llewellyn Publishing Trade Catalogue alone I counted 67 different Tarot decks, and Llewellyn is by no means the only publisher of Tarot cards. Not one of the decks illustrated had a hexagram on the lid of the box.

Mary Ann Herold lists three hexagrams in her A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies. The first is described by her as a "Kabbalistic Square Caballa."[150] The second, listed immediately below the first entry, shows a hexagram in a circle labeled: "Hexagram: Has been called the most evil sign in the occult world. Indicates the conjuration of demons".[151] The third is in a triple circle labeled "Magician's circle. Variation used in ceremonial magick."[152] Herold later includes a definition of the Qabalah which indicates that she is aware of the various spellings of this term but it is strange that she should have two different spellings in the same phrase.

The Colorado Bureau of Investigations Questioned Documents Examiner's Occult Guide lists the hexagram as a "Satanic Symbol". Dubois, in Occult Crime, states that the "Hexagram, aka the Seal of Solomon... [is] Also used by persons of the Jewish faith, who are not satanic... "[153] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists hexagrams in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[154] Detective Don Rimer's Ritual Crime and the Occult: The New Youth Subculture, includes "the star of David (hexagram)" in its list of "Satanic Symbols".

The hexagram is a six pointed star, also known as the Star of David and the Mogen David. Some texts refer to the hexagram as Solomon's Seal, while others assign this name to the pentagram (five pointed star) instead. The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn referred to it as the Signet Star or the Flaming Hexagram. Usually it is drawn as two equilateral triangles superimposed over one another, one pointing up and one pointing down. The six pointed Mogen David or Star of David, the modern symbol of Judaism and the state of Israel, is an example of such a hexagram. As a symbol of Israel it is only about 100 years old. However, Crowley, Regardie and others also used a unicursal form, that is easier to draw or trace in one motion. The Unicursive Hexagram is listed as a "Demonic Symbol" on the Madrak's Demonbusters web site. [155]

Each point of the hexagram is assigned a planet: The top point to Saturn, the top right point to Jupiter, the lower right point to Venus, the bottom point to the moon, the lower left point to Mercury and the upper left point to Mars. Many traditions trace the sign of the hexagram in the air during ritual. As a general rule, one traces clockwise from the angle whose element you are invoking, and counter-clockwise if you are banishing.

In Occidental Ceremonial Magick the hexagram is often separated into four forms:

  • Two triangles, apex up, one superimposed over the apex of the other. This form is related to the east and the element of fire.

  • The usual form of the hexagram, which is said to be related to the south and the element of earth.

  • Two triangles, one with the apex up and another reversed beneath it, base to base. This form is related to the west and to the element of air.

  • Two triangles, one above the other, one with the apex up and the other with the apex down, apex to apex. This form is related to the north and to the element of water.

    In Hindu spirituality the hexagram is a symbol of the sexual union of the Goddess Kali (the downward pointing triangle) and the God Shiva (the upward pointing triangle). In the magickal system of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn the hexagram is:
    • A symbol representing the operation of the seven planets under the Sephiroth and the name Ararita.

    • A symbol associated with the Sun.

    • The unicursal form of the hexagram is employed to indicate the presidency of the Sun and Moon over the 4 traditional elements united in and proceeding from spirit.
    In the Lemegeton the hexagram is referred to as the Hexagram of Solomon or the Double Seal of Solomon. This is a sigil traced on parchment and worn on the breast to control certain spirits. Waite refers to it as the "double seal of Solomon" in his translation of the Lemegeton.[156]

    As the Hexagram is a symbol of the modern state of Israel, it is often used in Satanic conspiracy myth literature in an anti-Semitic manner.

    Hocus Pocus:

    On the Demonbusters web site the Madraks tell us that the two most common "spells or charm works having magical import and which are familiar to everyone are: Abracadabra and Hocus-pocus."[157] They tell us that "The term hocus-pocus is generally used by magicians during sleight-of-hand tricks, or in conjuring and incantations. It is believed to be a corruption of the Latin hoc est corpus (this is the body), a phrase used by a Catholic priest in the ritual of the Mass when the bread is erroneously believed to become mystically transformed into Christ's body."[158] The truth is that the term Hocus Pocus came from a phoney Latin phrase, "hax pax max Deus adimax", used by traveling conjurers to impress their audiences. The word hoax is probably a shortened version of hocus pocus.[159] This is just an attempt on the part of the Madraks to further connect the Catholic church to their Satanic conspiracy legends.

    Inverted Pentagram:

    While this is a symbol commonly used by Satanists, it is also used by a lot of other people, a fact often overlooked by the people that list it in manuals on "occult crime". The Inverted pentagram is listed as a "Demonic Symbol" on the Madrak's Demonbusters web site. [160] In Schemes of Satan, Warnke claims that "The pentagram in this [inverted] position is almost universally a satanic symbol."[161]Warnke goes on to describe it as a symbol used by Satanists and the Temple of Set. Westhoelter, in his General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, depicts an inverted pentagram labeled "wisdom inspired by man" next to an upright pentagram labeled "wisdom inspired by God," which suggests Gnostic interpretations of these symbols, not Satanic ones.[162] Mary Ann Herold describes the inverted pentagram as the "Horned Star of Satan" and states that "Satanist Churches around the world use this symbol."[163] In America's Best Kept Secret, Frattarola states that the inverted Pentagram: "...often called the 'baphomet', is strictly Satanic in nature and represents the goat's head."[164]

    The inverted pentagram shows up in many police manuals too. Detective Rimer's Ritual Crime and the Occult: The New Youth Subculture, lists the inverted pentagram in its list of "Satanic Symbols". The Colorado Bureau of Investigations Questioned Documents Examiner's Occult Guide lists the inverted pentagram as a "Satanic Symbol", calling it a "Key of Solomon". Lt. Mitchell lists the inverted pentagram under "Ritual Paraphernalia" in Hidden Practices, stating that "In Satanism the Pentagram is inverted to accommodate the head of the goat, also to deny the Holy Trinity. The Hebraic figures around the outer circle of the symbol spell out 'Leviathan', meaning the serpent of the watery abyss and identified with Satan. The symbol is placed on the wall above the altar."[165]

    Satanists use an inverted pentagram as a symbol as they interpret the four points of the elements over the point of spirit as representing the domination of matter over reason. It also, coincidentally, vaguely resembles a stylized goat's head, though this is probably a very recent interpretation. A symbol of Anton LaVey's Church of Satan is an inverted pentagram on a circular field with a goat's head superimposed over it, referred to by them as the Sigil of Baphomet. The Temple of set has adopted the inverted pentagram against a circular field as their symbol. The color of the background field indicates the degree of initiation of the wearer.

    However, there are others who use this symbol too. Wiccans use the inverted pentagram to denote the second degree of initiation in some traditions of Wicca. The Order of the Eastern Star, a women's Masonic order, uses the inverted pentagram as their symbol. As a matter of interest, the US Medal of Honor is an inverted pentagram.

    Key of Solomon:

    In Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Rapacki tells us that the "Key of Solomon" is the "Title of a famous medieval grimoire published in two forms: The Greater Key of Solomon and the Lesser Key, or Goetia. The Lesser Key contains detailed commentaries of the nature of the spirits summoned in ceremonial magic, including those used in medieval witchcraft and necromancy."[166] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual includes Key of Solomon in its list of occult terms.[167] You've already seen several references to this text earlier in this chapter. You'll recall from my discussion of grimoires earlier that The Greater Key of Solomon and The Lesser Key of Solomon were two separate and unrelated documents.

    Labrys/Axe/Anti-Justice Symbol:

    The The Labrys, described as an "Ax From Crete" is listed as a "Demonic Symbol" on the Madrak's Demonbusters web site.[168] The appendix at the end of Johnston's The Edge of Evil depicts a symbol resembling an upside down double headed axe and calls it a representation of "anti-justice." Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists double headed axes in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[169]

    The Labrys, is a double bladed ax that is a symbol of several Greek and Roman Goddesses, including Artemis, Gaea, Rhea and Demeter. It was used as a ceremonial scepter at the shrine of the Goddess in Delphi. Because of the Amazon qualities of Goddesses like Artemis some modern day lesbians have adopted the labrys as a symbol. The double bladed ax is a symbol found in several other cultures as well. In India it is carried by the God Shiva. In ancient Egypt it was a symbol of the God Ptah. It also appears in Mayan art. The double headed axe is also a symbol of the Orisha Chango.

    I have encountered definitions in some recent texts that claim that the double bladed ax was a Roman symbol of justice and that if inverted it becomes a symbol of "anti justice". This is incorrect: Actually the Roman symbol of justice was the Fasces: A single bladed axe or arrow with birch rods bound to it with red thongs. In ancient times these were carried by "lictors" (assistants to the magistrate).

    Left Hand/Right Hand:

    People presenting themselves as "experts" on "occult crime" often go on about the left hand vs. the right hand path. For example: In the film Dave Roever Presents: Exposing The Satanic Web, there is a discussion on this subject by Ken McBride (who claims to have been a former Satanic priest). This subject showed up at a lecture on Satanic Ritual Abuse conducted by Detective Jerry Simandl in 1992. Retired Captain Dale Griffis gave testimony regarding this subject in a homicide trial in Arkansas in 1994.

    These people appear to have adapted this concept from an idea that was popularized by the founder of Theosophy, H. P. Blavatsky (1831-1891 CE). Blavatsky borrowed the idea from Tantrism, a form of Yoga from India. In Tantrism the female was positioned to the right of the male for Mantra and Mudra ceremonies. For erotic ceremonies she was positioned to the left of the male. Blavatsky felt ritual sex of any form to be perverse, so she used the term "left hand path" to describe magickal systems that she disapproved of and "right hand path" to describe those that she sanctioned. She may also have been influenced by Inquisitional folklore about left handed people. The demonologists of the Inquisition taught that people who were left handed (in other words, different from the norm) were Witches. Ultimately, through popular usage, the term "left hand path" later came to be a term for evil or black magic.

    Lemegeton:

    Warnke, in Schemes of Satan, claims that "In a grimoire known as the Lemegeton, one may discover a group of names that are associated with demonic beings. (An occultist may not refer to these beings as demons, however.) The numerical symbol of 666 is often used in rituals designed to call forth or banish demons."[170]

    The Lemegeton, also known as the Lesser Key of Solomon or the Goetia, is attributed to King Solomon (as is the Greater Key of Solomon). This is highly unlikely. The Lemegeton is unrelated to The Greater Key of Solomon, the name merely being an attempt on someone's part to try to give it some of the mystery of The Greater Key of Solomon. The earliest surviving examples are French and date back to the 17th century CE. The Lemegeton has four parts: The Goetia, the Theurgia Goetia, the Pauline Art, and the Almadel. In the Lemegeton, one does find a long list of names of spirits that the magician may call upon. Not one of the invocations contained in the Lemegeton mention the number 666.

    Lost Books of Moses:

    The Lost Books of Moses are mentioned in Herold's A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies: "'Lost' Books of Moses (and The 44 Secret Keys to Universal Power)-- supposedly the 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th books written by the Old Testament prophet, Moses. These texts portray Moses as a skilled magician and instruct in the ways of conjuring spirits and preparing and offering burnt and blood sacrifice."[171]

    They also turn up on the Demonbusters web site: "Sixth and Seventh Book of Moses: The sorcerers of the middle ages only chose Moses as their patron saint, because he outdid the ancient Egyptian sorcerers by the power of God. This includes magic spells, and how to kill small animals by magical power."[172]

    They turn up as well in Sgt. Edwin Anderson's Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime: "Book of Moses: The standard magician's code of the Middle Ages; it contains a complicated ritual for the induction of neophytes."[173]

    The 44 Secret Keys to Universal Power, also known as the Curiosa, is the third chapter of "The Book of Miscellany" of The Mystery of the Long Lost 8th, 9th, and 10th Books of Moses by Henri Gamache. This is another example of the many books of Ceremonial magic claiming authorship by Biblical figures like Solomon or Moses. The fact that Herold includes 6th and 7th books in the title is an indication that she has never actually seen a copy of it. Of the 43 magical operations described in this book, only three make reference to sacrifice:

  • The preparation of a talisman, attributed to an "old Arab writer, Ibn Khaldoun", which calls upon the magician to sacrifice a bird and sprinkle it's blood on the talisman.[174]

  • The preparation of a nostrum which calls upon the magician to put a silver plate in the mouth of a cock and kill it.[175]

  • The preparation of a nostrum intended to "heal a man from enchantment" that calls upon the magician to put a document in the mouth of a cat "which has been killed."[176] This doesn't specifically say that the cat has to be sacrificed: Presumably you just have to find a dead cat.

    The only references to burning anything in Gamache's book are to burning pieces of paper or parchment on which things have been written: There is no mention of any "burnt offerings." All of this is further proof that Herold is not as familiar with the book as she claims.

    The Book of Moses is mentioned in the Bible in 2 Chronicles 25:4, 2 Chronicles 35:12, Ezra 6:18, Nehemiah 13:1 and Mark 12:26. It was a book of the law written by Moses and presented to his people, including the Ten Commandments, and forms a well known part of the Judeo-Christian mythology. As was done in the case of several other published philosophers or religious leaders, Henri Gamache later translated a spurious text claiming to be the long lost 8th, 9th and 10th books of Moses, which is still in print.[177] There is also a 6th and 7th Lost Book of Moses in print which is as fraudulent as the other one. These are the "lost books" being referred to here.

    Magister:

    Westhoelter, in his NIN manual, states that "In witchcraft, devil is a 'little god' title for the magister as representative of one of the Mighty Ones".[178] The glossary of Johnston's The Edge of Evil lists "Magister" as the "Male leader of a coven"[179], a definition which is repeated in the newsletter of Lt. Larry Jones.[180] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual includes Magister in its list of occult terms.[181]

    Magister is a word derived from a Latin root meaning "teacher". It is a title commonly used by groups practicing Occidental Ceremonial magick. For example, a "Magister Templi" is the eighth rank above the beginner's rank of probationer and the lowest rank within the highest order of Aleister Crowley's Argentium Astrum. One of the two traditions of Wicca that use Magister as a title is the 1734 tradition of Robert Cochrane, which is followed by the Ancient Keltic Church and the Roebuck tradition, amongst others. In the 1734 tradition it is used as the title of the male priest, the priestess being known by the title Lady or Dame. The other is the Frost's Church and School of Wicca. Frost lists ten levels (Neophyte, Zelator, Practicus, Philosophus, Adeptus Minor, Adeptus Major, Adeptus Exemptus, Magister Templi, Magus and Ipsissimus) in his book The Witch's Bible.[182]

    Magus:

    Alleged former Satanic priest John Todd once told Dayton Daily News staff writer Wes Hills that he was the local "Grand Magnus [sic]" of the Wiccan Church.[183] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual includes Magus in its list of occult terms.[184] In the glossary in The Edge of Evil, Johnston defines the term "Magus" as "A male witch"[185], a definition which is repeated in the File 18 newsletter of Lt. Larry Jones.[186] Obviously neither is unaware that Wiccans refer to a male Witch as "a male Witch".

    Magus is a Latin term, derived from the Greek "magos", referring to one of the Medean tribe, who were purported to be enchanters. An enchantress is a Maga. The plural is Magi. The word "magic" is derived from the same root. Magus is the ninth rank above the beginner's rank of probationer and the second highest rank of Crowley's Astrum Argentium, represented by the formula 9 degree = 2 squared. It is also a title for one who has received the fifth degree of initiation within Anton LaVey's Church of Satan, as well as the title of a male holding the fifth degree of initiation within the Temple of Set. The only Wiccan group that uses the title Magus is Gavin Frost's Church and School of Wicca. The inference here is that all Wiccans use the term Magus too, which is not the case.

    Mjolnir/Thor's Hammer:

    I have frequently encountered "occult experts" who couldn't tell a Labrys from Mjolnir. Some can tell them apart but think that they're both Satanic. For example, Detective Don Rimer's Ritual Crime and the Occult: The New Youth Subculture includes "the Thor's Hammer" in its list of "Satanic Symbols". In Norse Mythology Thor was the son of Odin. Thor was the God of the sky and thunder. Thursday is named after him. It was believed that lightning was the sparks created when Thor struck his anvil with his hammer Mjolnir. It was also believed that Thor used Mjolnir to break up the ice in spring. Decorated replicas of this hammer were often worn as amulets, and many followers of Germanic Neo-Pagan spirituality wear it as a symbol of their faith. Crowley mentions Mjolnir in the cry of the aethyr Arn in Liber Aervm Vel Saecvli.

    Necronomicon:

    I am continually running into people that have discovered the Necronomicon and think that it is an actual ancient magical grimoire. For example: Eric Pryor refers to it as an ancient book, one of the most evil ever written. On the Demonbusters web site, the Necronomicon is listed as a text used by "Satanists and Setians".[187] In Occult Crime Control Dubois has also listed all of the Necronomicon's entities and their seals. In A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, Herold describes the Necronomicon as a "testament written by the 'Mad Arab', Abdul Alhazred, in the 9th Century A.D. Literally, 'Book of the Dead', or the Book of Black Earth. It serves as an amulet and a talisman against the Forces of Darkness. This is a sorcerer's handbook dealing with necromancy (communicating with the dead), invocations and conjurations of spirits, and, among other things, magickal formulas. This book is extraordinarily potent and, like all of the others I have mentioned, extremely dangerous."[188]

    There are at least four versions of the Necronomicon, one of which simply repeats the first 20 pages over and over, as if the author expected that no one in his right mind would read any further before discarding it. The well known fantasy writer HP Lovecraft mentioned the Necronomicon in his works and it is widely believed that at least one version of the Necronomicon was written by him under the pseudonym Abdul "The Mad Arab" Alhazred as a joke, although this cannot be conclusively proven. It is possible that someone seized upon Lovecraft's idea and wrote it for the same reason, but no one has come forward to claim responsibility. Either way, it is certain that it is a very recent hoax.

    Continue on to Definitions... Symbols (A-B) - Symbols (C-F) - Symbols (G-N) - Symbols (O-S) - Symbols (T-Z)



    Footnotes...

    [132] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 57.
    [133] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 18.
    [134] Ibid, pg 36.
    [135] Herold, Mary Ann. (1984). A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 51.
    [136] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 14.
    [137] CCIN Inc, File 18 newsletter, Vol 3, No. 6, pg 1.
    [138] Watson, William. (1991). A Concise Dictionary of Cults and Religions, pg 104.
    [139] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 60.
    [140] http://www.themystica.com/mystica/articles/h/hand_of_glory.html
    [141] http://www.shadowdrake.com/folklore/hand.html
    [142] WICCA - SATAN'S LITTLE WHITE LIE", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w9.html
    [143] (2 February 1979). Plowman, Edward E. "The Legends of John Todd", Christianity Today, pg 19.
    [144] Sloat, Lou: Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 76.
    [145] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 58.
    [146] Frattarola, John: "Passport Magazine Special Edition: America's Best Kept Secret", insert "A Look At Modern Day Satanism", page 2.
    [147] Marrs, Texe: Mystery Mark of the New Age, pg 118.
    [148] Warnke, Mike. (1991). Schemes of Satan, pg 168.
    [149] Carder, Thomas. Back To School Special, ChildCare Action Project: Christian Analysis of American Culture, http://www.capalert.com/backtoschool/backtoschool.htm
    [150] Herold, Mary Ann. (1984). A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 15.
    [151] Ibid, pg 15.
    [152] Ibid, pg 38.
    [153] William Dubois. Occult Crime Control, pg 52 and Occult Crime, pg 92.
    [154] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [155] WICCA - SATAN'S LITTLE WHITE LIE", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w9.html
    [156] Waite, Arthur Edward. The Book of Black Magic and Ceremonial Magic, pg 221.
    [157] "Amulets, Spells, Charms and Taboos" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w1.html
    [158] Ibid.
    [159] Ayto, John. (1990). Dictionary of Word Origins, pg 284.
    [160] WICCA - SATAN'S LITTLE WHITE LIE", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w9.html
    [161] Warnke, Mike. (1991). Schemes of Satan, pg 164.
    [162] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 86.
    [163] Herold, Mary Ann. A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 35.
    [164] Frattarola, John: "Passport Magazine Special Edition: America's Best Kept Secret", insert "A Look At Modern Day Satanism", page 2.
    [165] Mitchell, Norman E. Hidden Practices.
    [166] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 58.
    [167] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 14.
    [168] WICCA - SATAN'S LITTLE WHITE LIE", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w9.html
    [169] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [170] Warnke, Mike. (1991). Schemes of Satan, pg 167.
    [171] Herold, Mary Ann. (1984). A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 15.
    [172] "Occult ABC- Exposing Occult Practices and Ideologies" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w4.html
    [173] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 9.
    [174] Gamache, Henri. (1983). Mystery of the Long Lost 8th, 9th and 10th Books of Moses, Together With the Legend that was of Moses and 44 Keys to Universal Power, Original Publications, NY, pg 89. Originally published by Marvel Book Co.
    [175] Ibid, pg 98.
    [176] Ibid, pg 102.
    [177] GAMACHE, Henri. (1983). Mystery of the Long Lost 8th, 9th and 10th Books of Moses, Original Publications, New York.
    [178] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 60.
    [179] Johnston, Jerry. (1989). The Edge of Evil, Word Publishing, Vancouver, BC, pg 319.
    [180] CCIN Inc, File 18 newsletter, Vol 3, No. 6, pg 1.
    [181] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 14.
    [182] Frost, Gavin. (1972). The Witch's Bible, Nash Publishing, Los Angeles, pg 9.
    [183] (25 January 1976). "Witches Embroiled," Dayton Daily News.
    [184] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 14.
    [185] Johnston, Jerry. (1989). The Edge of Evil, Word Publishing, Vancouver, BC, Appendix.
    [186] CCIN Inc, File 18 newsletter, Vol 3, No. 6, pg 1.
    [187] "Demons and Characteristics", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html.
    [188] Herold, Mary Ann. A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 51.






    ABOUT...

    Kerr Cuhulain


    Location: Surrey, British Columbia

    Website: http://www.officersofavalon.com

    Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

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