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Witch Hunts - Exposing The Lies

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About Policing the Shadows

Alan Herbert Peterson

Allan Yusko’s Bible Prophesy and Rapture Report

Basic Warding

Bill Schnoebelen [1]

Bill Schnoebelen [2]

Blaming 'Witchcraft's Control'

Breaking the Spell: The Hidden Traps of Wicca

Christian Authors [1]

Christian Authors [2]

Christian Authors [3]

Christian Authors [4]

Christian Authors [5]

Christian Authors [6]

Christian Authors [7]

Christian Authors [8]

Contender Ministries

Crossroads Ministries/Berit Kjos

The Crusade Against Rock & Roll [1]

The Crusade Against Rock & Roll [2]

The Crusade Against Rock & Roll [n]

The Cycle Continues

David Brown [1]

David Brown [2]

David Brown [3]

David Brown [4]

Demonbusters [1]

Demonbusters [2]

Demonbusters [3]

Demonbusters [4]

Demons (A-B)

Demons (C-G)

Demons (H-L)

Demons (M-R)

Demons (S-Z)

Demons Intro

Desiring Blessed Quietness [1]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [2]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [3]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [4]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [n]

Dogs and the Environment

Ed Decker: Saints Alive in Jesus

The Encyclopedia of Satanic Wicca

Eric Pryor [1]

Eric Pryor [2]

Eric Pryor [3]

Eric Pryor [4]

Evangelists [1]

Evangelists [2]

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Evangelists [4]

Evangelists [5]

Ex Pagan 4 Christ [1]

Ex Pagan 4 Christ [2]

Experts [1]

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Experts [3]

Experts [4]

Experts [5]

Experts [6]

Experts [7]

Experts [8]

Experts [n]

Experts [n]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [1]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [2]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [3]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [4]

Jack Chick [1]

Jack Chick [2]

Jack Chick [3]

Jack Chick [4]

Jeremiah Films [1]

Jeremiah Films [2]

Jeremiah Films [3]

Jeremiah Films [4]

Jesus Messiah Fellowship [1]

Jesus Messiah Fellowship [2]

Jesus Messiah Fellowship [3]


NOTE: For a complete list of articles related to this chapter... Visit the Main Index FOR this section.










Symbols (C-F)

Author: Kerr Cuhulain
Posted: July 4th. 2004
Times Viewed: 18,575

Cauldron:

Cauldrons are listed as evidence of Satanic activity in Herold's A Basic Guide to the occult for Law Enforcement Agencies.[74] In Paganism-Satanism-Witchraft: The Subculture Primer, JackRoper depicts a three legged cauldron and quotes Man, Myth and Magic, Vol 3: "We know from classical writings that the early Celts sacrificed human beings by drowning them in cauldrons or vats." Roper then adds his own comment: "In the past human victims have been slaughtered and the cauldron used as a reservoir for the victim's blood".[75] Roper's comment is an assumption that was made based on a scene depicted on the side of the Gundestrup Cauldron, found in the Raevemose peat bog in Jutland. This cauldron dates from the 3rd or 4th century BCE. One of its interior surfaces depicts a large figure holding another smaller one over a vat or cauldron. Some have taken this to represent a sacrifice, where the larger figure is drowning the smaller one. However, while no such sacrifices are described in Celtic mythology, one very common story in Celtic mythology involves the cauldron as a magical implement of rebirth and regeneration. Several Celtic legends involve magic cauldrons that are used to bring dead warriors back to life. Since this same scene in the Gundestrup cauldron is surrounded by soldiers, on foot and on horseback, it is very likely to be an artistic rendition of just such a legend.

Definitions of "cauldron" that I've found in "occult crime manuals" over the years include:

  • "Like a cup; Medieval witches were said to stir their magical concoctions in a cauldron".[76]

  • "A large cup or pot used by Satanic practitioners. Medieval witches were said to stir up their magical concoctions in a cauldron."[77]

    This is an image borrowed from the demonologists of the Inquisition and the play MacBeth, not reality. Many Pagan and Neo Pagan religious groups use cauldrons in their ritual circles, but not for concocting poisonous brews. A cauldron, is of course a large, iron pot. The Middle English word was "caldron" or "caudron", and first appeared in Gower's Confessio Amantis before 1393. Before 1300 it was spelled "caudrun". This word comes from the Old French "caudron" or "chaudron". It derives from the Late Latin "caldaria" ("a kettle for hot water").[78] The cauldron is an ancient symbol of the Celtic Goddess Cerridwen, found in many Pagan ritual circles. It is a Celtic symbol of rebirth and regeneration. What Westhoelter is obviously alluding to here is the well known scene in Shakespeare's play MacBeth, where the three "weird sisters" were stirring a brew in a cauldron. The three "weird sisters", are never referred to by Shakespeare or the characters in the play as "witches," although director's notes inserted in the margins by someone other than Shakespeare at a later date labeled them "witches". They actually represent the three mythical Norse Norns or Wyrds, three sisters who controlled man's fate by weaving together the two forces, wyrd and orlog. The Norns are cognate with the Greek Moirae (Fates). Modern Wiccans often use their cauldrons (if they own one) to contain fires, not liquids.

    Celtic Cross:

    This ancient Celtic symbol is a solar motif. The Celtic Cross was later adopted by the Christian church, but you'd never know that from some of the definitions that you find in books by some Christian authors. For example, in Westhoelter's General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, the artist has a five-armed figure labeled "Celtic Cross".[79] Actually a Celtic Cross, a common Christian symbol in Celtic countries, has four arms of equal length, not five.

    Ceremonial Magic:

    Rapacki defines Ceremonial Magic as "Magic that employs ritual symbols and ceremony. Ceremonial magic stimulates the senses by including in its rituals ceremonial costumes, dramatic invocations to the gods or spirits, potent incense and mystic sacraments."[80] What Rapacki does not inform his reader, probably because he does not know, is that the symbols and sacraments used in this magical tradition are Judaic and Christian and that the invocations to deity are not to Gods but to Jehovah. Some of the spirits invoked in this tradition are demons, but more often than not they are angels. Actually, Rapacki's description here could apply equally well to a Roman Catholic Mass.

    Chakra:

    In Mystery Mark of the New Age, Texe Marrs states: "In today's New Age and Hindu philosophies, the body is made up of certain points or chakras. Two important chakras are the one in the forehead and the other in the palm of the right hand. Note that these are the same body sites revealed in the Bible as where the Mark of the Beast will be taken."[81]

    Chakra (Variations: Cakkra, Padma) is a Hindu term meaning "wheels". In Hindu and Tantric metaphysics, chakras are the energy centers located along the spine. The are also known as Padmas ("lotuses"). Chakras are energy centers that are recognized in Yoga and in Eastern medical traditions. From the lowest to the highest they are: Muladhara, Swadhisthana, Manipura, Anahata, Vissudda, Ajna, Sahasrara and Bindu. In Hindu philosophy the spiritual power known as Kundalini ("coiled"), life energy symbolized by a coiled green snake coiled in a left hand spiral, is thought to rise from the lowest Chakra up to the highest through the spinal cord, which is known as Sushumna. It is then thought to flow back down channels to either side of the spine called Ida and Pingala. Chakras are mentioned in Crowley's "Comment on Liber VII in class E" in Liber VII: Liber Liberi vel Lapidis Lazuli, Advmbratio Kabbalae Aegyptiorum Svb Figvra VII. Certain shapes or symbols are traditionally associated to each chakra, but these are visualized to help energize them, not actually marked on the body.

    Marrs is correct in identifying one of these chakras as being on the forehead (it is between the eyebrows actually). Marrs even gets the name right elsewhere in his book: Ajna. However, while most Yoga and Eastern Medical traditions recognize "sub-chakras" or minor energy points in the hands, none of these beliefs classify the hands as major chakras or energy points and none of them hold one hand to be more important than the other.

    Chalice:

    In the glossary of Johnston's The Edge of Evil a chalice is defined as "A Silver goblet used for blood communions."[82]A chalice is a ceremonial cup or goblet often used to represent the element Water in magickal work. The term first appeared in this form in English about 1325. In Middle English (circa 1102) it was spelled "calice" and in Old English "celic", "calic" or "caelc". In old French it is "calix" ("cup") and it can be traced back through Greek ("kylix") and Sanskrit ("kalasa-s") to Indo-European ("kel/kol" = "pot,cup").[83] A chalice is indeed used in the Wiccan ceremony of cakes and wine, but never to hold blood. Wiccans do not engage in blood sacrifice. The chalice was also used by several other religious groups, including the ceremonies of the Knights Templar, the initiations of some higher degrees of Freemasonry, and rites of the various Satanic traditions. A chalice is one of the magickal tools used by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, considered by them to be under the presidency of the Hebrew letter Heh.

    Circle:

    Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists circles in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[84] Definitions of "circle" that I've found in "occult crime manuals" over the years include:
    • "Drawn on the ground at times with salt 8 feet in diameter. To enforce demons to appear [sic]".[85]

    • "The satanic circle is well-known among witches and Satan-worshippers... The point within the circle is the sign of Lucifer."[86]

    • "Nine (9) feet in diameter, drawn on the floor for protection."[87]
    In Ceremonial Magick the Circle is a defense, meant to keep unwanted influences and spirits out. In the version described in the Lemegeton, a triangle is drawn on the ground outside of this circle is placed in whatever quarter is appropriate to the spirit being evoked or invoked. Another variation, taken from the Greater Key of Solomon, has an inner circle with a radius of 9 feet, with the second and third circles having a radius of 10 and 11 feet respectively. Most grimoires describe one Circle which is used for all magickal operations, but there are exceptions. Honorius specified a general purpose circle as well as a different Circle for each day of the week. The Grand Grimoire specifies two circles: A Grand Kabalistic Circle and a Circle of White Magic.

    Satanists, borrowing much of their ritual from ceremonial magic, also usually use ritual circles as a psychic defense. A notable exception to this is the Temple of Set, which does not use any ritual circle, as Setians believe that they are one with the forces they use and do not require protection from them.

    In Neo Pagan religions such as Wicca, the Circle is a sacred space which may be created anywhere, as opposed to temples or churches in other religions, which are, of course, not portable. A Wiccan circle is both a defense and a container, meant to keep the energy that we raise in and unwanted influences out. A Wiccan Circle traditionally has a diameter of 9 feet, not 8 feet, as nine is the number of the moon. In practice a Wiccan circle is often made larger, since this makes for a very small working area. Try fitting 13 people or more in a 9 foot Circle with an altar and you'll see that this begins to resemble one of those high school pranks where you see how many people you can cram into a phone booth.

    Wiccan circles may be "closed" or "open" Some covens are now providing public rituals which are open to non-initiates. Such rituals are referred to as "Open Circles". Such public "Open Circles" are often referred to as "Pagan rituals" in order to differentiate them from "Closed Circles" or "Wiccan rituals" in which all of the participants are initiated Wiccans.

    A coven holding an Open Circle will usually use somewhat different ritual forms than they ordinarily use in Closed Circles, but this is not always the case. Examples of situations where one would find an open Circle are:
    • Major public Pagan festivals, sponsored by various Wiccan and Pagan organizations. These have proved to be very popular, some of then attracting in the neighborhood of 700-800 people. Open Circles are usually held at such festivals so that people from a variety of traditions and beliefs can come together and share ideas. While many at such festivals are relying on others to organize the events for them, such ritual is still not truly congregational in nature, since it is still intended to allow each participant to experience aspects of deity personally.

    • An open Circle where a candidate for initiation is allowed to participate in order to see if they can work harmoniously with the other coven members.

    • An open Circle where a visitor is permitted to participate in the Circle of a Coven from a different tradition.
    So you can see that Occidental ceremonial magicians and Satanists (who both use Judaic and Christian symbolism and mythology in their rituals) do not use circles drawn on the ground to enforce demons to appear. They use the circle as a magical protection against the demons or spirits which they believe may appear.

    Incidentally ceremonial magicians and Satanists do not refer to calling on demons as "enforcing demons to appear". It is called "evoking". When ceremonial magicians "ask angels to appear" it is called "invoking". Wiccans do not use the ceremonial systems used by the previous two groups and do not believe in demons or angels, so they don't "enforce demons to appear" or "evoke".

    Cornu:

    This is a hand gesture which has been misinterpreted as a Satanic recognition signal in many books on Satanism. For example, Michael Warnke refers to this gesture as a recognition signal for "the Brotherhood" in The Satan Seller. The cornu gesture is prominently displayed by all of the people on the cover of Frattarola's America's Best Kept Secret. Mary Ann Herold lists it twice in A Basic Manual on the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies. A cornu, also described as an "Italian Horn", is listed as a "Demonic Symbol" on the Madrak's Demonbusters web site.[88] The glossary of the Watch Network's Be Aware! handbook defines "Horned Hand" as "The 'horned hand' is the sign of recognition between those who are in the occult".[89] Thomas Carder's ChildCare Action Project/Christian Analysis of American Culture web site defines the "horned hand or the mano cornuto" thus:

    "This gesture is the satanic salute, a sign of recognition between and allegiance of members of satanism or other unholy groups. It is also called the Il Cornuto. In other 'circles,' whether displayed as a hand gesture or worn as an amulet, it is supposed to ward off evil (the evil eye) as are the hamsa hand (three finger - two thumbed hand), the eye-in-hand (eye in the palm), and the mano fico ('mano' meaning hand and 'fico' meaning woman's genitals)."[90]

    Eventually the cornu or "horned hand" showed up in several police manuals. Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists the cornu as a "horned hand sign" in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[91] Other examples include:

  • "A satanic salute or sign among members; represents devil's horns. Often used innocently by adolescent heavy metal groupies without knowing its alternate meaning."[92]

  • "Originally used by Pseudo-Satanists as a secret hand sign to gain access to rituals, the sign is now widely used by Self-styled Satanists to indicate that they are in league with Satan."[93]

    The "cornu", "mano cornuto" or "horned hand" salute is made by raising one's hand with the index and little fingers extended and the other fingers and thumb folded against the palm. In different contexts this means quite a few things, including the following:

  • In Wicca this is used in some traditions as the sign of the Horned God. Warnke may have been aware of this, as he is using it in reference to what he describes as "witches" here.

  • In some Native American traditions this is the sign of the Buffalo.

  • Anton LaVey adopted this as a Satanic salute, resulting in it being advertised as such by books such as these.

  • It is a recognition signal used by the Piru (Bloods) gang members in Los Angeles.

  • It is a symbol of the Texas Longhorns football team.

  • It is a slang hand sign in American sign language for the colloquial expression "bullshit".

    This last interpretation of this hand sign pretty much sums up the content of most of the books that list it as a purely Satanic symbol. Incidentally, the image of the hand with the eye in the palm that Carder referred to is a common image in Tibet and in the art of the Native American mound builders.

    Cosmic Egg:

    This ancient symbol has found it's way into several manuals on the "occult". For example, Mary Ann Herold lists an oval in a rectangle with this as the caption in a list of evidence indicating Satanic involvement.[94] There are many ancient myths concerning cosmic eggs. In Greek Mythology the Goddess Leto hatched the sun and moon out of an egg. The Egyptian Goddess Hathor hatched the golden egg of the sun. Eggs are symbols of fertility, such as the eggs that are the symbol of the Goddess Eostre that appear around the Christian festival of Easter. I'm not aware of this symbol ever having been used by a Satanic group.

    Coven:

    The glossary of Watch Network's Be Aware! handbook defines "coven" as "A group of six male and six female witches with a high priest or priestess. Satanic rites are parodies of Christian worship. One such rite is the Black Mass. Satanists practice a form of baptism and have their own corrupted kind of communion services. Sometimes human flesh and blood are used in this communion service. The Black Mass is celebrated over the body of a naked young woman. Satanists believe that all forms of perverted sexual indulgences are good".[95]

    The term "coven" dates back to 1500-20 CE and was a variation of the earlier words "covent" or "cuvent", which are found in the Ancrene Riwle. It came into the English language through the Old French words "covenant" and "covenir". These words came, in turn, from the Latin "convenire" ("to agree, to be of one mind, to come together"). Thus a coven is a group of people who are of one mind, who come together with a common purpose.

    Coven first appeared in reference to "a gathering of witches" in 1662.[96] The word Coven is usually used today to refer to a Wiccan group, though it is sometimes used by the popular press to describe groups of Satanists, probably due to popular Christian literature. Modern Satanists actually refer to their groups as Grottos or Pylons. The description of ritual here is Satanic folklore of the Inquisitional variety and does not resemble any Wiccan ceremony.

    Coven Marker/Ritual Marker:

    It is quite common for manuals meant to educate police about "occult crime" to include a section on markers for ritual sites. For example, Mary Ann Herold lists an anarchy symbol as a "coven marker" in A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement. "Trail markers" are listed as "Identifiers of Occult Relations" in Alford's Occult Crimes Investigations.[97]Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists ritual markers in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[98] Detective Rimer's "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse'" warns the investigator to "Look for painted rocks, symmetrically placed rocks, bones, feathers, or symbols that would indicate traps. Do not touch any substance at a ritual site without wearing gloves. Poison is often used during ritual ceremonies."[99] I've never seen any Pagan using traps or poison in rituals in over 33 years of Wiccan practice all over North America. Rimer also complained about my criticism of his claims about poisons and/or traps at occult sites. "I have never said that all ritual sites include poisons or traps," he complained, "But if you have never seen these items, you must stay out of the woods. In my more than 30 years of law enforcement service, we have visited dozens of ritual sites used by Satanists or other dangerous cult groups where poison or traps were present. I work closely with the State Police who have called me to rural areas where we examined sites that included poison, hallucinogenics, snares, nooses, tiger pits, guillotines, animal traps, etc. We frequently caution our drug agents about the poisons and drugs used by practitioners of Santeria, Brujeria, Palo Mayombe, and Voodoo."[100] This all sounds very interesting, but once again, this remark about traps and poison was on his list of "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse." Occult takes in a lot of different things: He isn't specific and he should be.

    Cowan:

    Joseph "Doc" Marquis once claimed that "We have those witches we call cowans, C-O-W-A-N, that a traitor, that's what I am, because I left the order."[101] In his General Information Manual with Respect to Satanism and the Occult, Shane Westhoelter defines a cowan as "Uninitiated intruder".[102]

    While cowan certainly means "uninitiated", asserting that it means "intruder" is pushing things a bit. The Wiccan term "cowan" does not mean "traitor." The etymology of this word is uncertain, but it appears to be a term derived from the Greek word "kyon" ("a dog"). The use of this word in English originated in Scotland, where it was a term to describe a stone mason who had picked up his trade without serving an apprenticeship or to a mason who built "drystane dykes" (ie.: walls without mortar). Like a dog these persons were supposed to be inquisitive, sticking their noses into that which did not concern them. Later this term was adopted from the Scottish stone masons by the Freemasons to describe those who practice Freemasonry without having been properly initiated or to a person who is not of the brotherhood of Freemasonry. It first appeared in this context in Anderson's Constitutions[103] in 1769 CE. Wiccans later borrowed this term from Freemasonry to describe someone who is not a Wiccan. Marquis is confusing this with the term "warlock", which does mean "oath breaker" or "traitor" and was used by Christians in reference to witches as they felt that we were traitors to Christianity. Cowan is not a term used by Satanists.

    Crescent Moon:

    In The Satan Seller, Warnke states that "The crescent moon is occasionally employed to represent Diana, the moon goddess... This symbol may also appear with a small star representing Lucifer, the morning star. (The Muslim usage of the crescent is not related to the occult."[104] In America's Best Kept Secret, John Frattarola shows us a drawing of a crescent moon and star and states: "Here, the moon goddess 'Diana' and the morning star of 'Lucifer' are represented. This symbol may be found in both White Witchcraft and Satanism. When the moon is turned to face the opposite direction, it is primarily Satanic."[105] This same definition appears at the ed of in Johnston's The Edge of Evil in an Appendix of Symbols under "Waxing Moon and Star Symbol."[106] Mary Ann Herold claims that the "Crescent symbolizes Diana (Queen of Heaven), [and the] star symbolizes Lucifer."[107]

    This symbol ultimately shows up in law enforcement manuals. Anderson's Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime includes this definition: "Crescent Moon and stars: The moon represents the female god Diana and the stars Lucifer..."[108] In Dubois's Occult Crime it appears as "The Morning Star... Symbolizes Lucifer as the Morning Star, another name for Satan."[109] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists moons and stars in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[110] Detective Rimer's handout, Ritual Crime and the Occult: The New Youth Subculture, includes the crescent moon and star in a list of "Satanic Symbols". Thomas Carder's ChildCare Action Project/Christian Analysis of American Culture web site defines the "star and crescent [of Islam]" thus:

    "With God mockingly placed as the moon (the goddess of love, Dianna [sic]), Satan assumes the role of the star, which is a mockery of Jesus as the ...bright and morning star...: [Rev. 22:16] 'I Jesus have sent mine angel to testify unto you these things in the churches. I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star.' Satan (plus a full third of the other angels in heaven) was cast out of heaven because of trying to usurp Jesus -- Satan wanted Jesus' position. Recall Milton: 'It is better to rule in Hell than to serve in Heaven.' Man, what a lie! So, it is no wonder Satan tries to unjustly claim that which Jesus owns, for one, His ownership of being the bright and morning star. And, of course, if you will note the relative positions of the star and crescent moon in the image -- the star is over the moon. Drs. Haynes and Carlin share with us that the symbol may be found in both white and witchcraft and satanism."[111]

    The crescent of the new moon is referred to by Pagans as "Diana's Bow". Diana is the Roman Goddess of the Moon and of nature. Warnke and others are borrowing the idea that Diana and Lucifer are part of the same mythology from the book Aradia: Gospel of the Witches by Charles Geoffrey Leland. The crescent moon and star is also a well known symbol of Islam, which may be why some fundamentalist Christian authors like Carder are tempted to misidentify it as a Satanic symbol.

    Cross of Confusion:

    This popular symbol, usually depicted as a cross with the lower vertical line replaced with an upside-down question mark, appears frequently in Satanic conspiracy literature. For example, in Schemes of Satan, Warnke defines the cross of confusion thus: "The origins of this symbol are not completely known, but in modern usage it denotes an upside-down cross which questions the deity of Christ."[112] Definitions that I've encountered in "occult crime manuals" include:
    • "[Satanic cross:] The holy Cross with an upside down question mark attached to the bottom. The question mark is to state to observers that they should question Jesus: his Work, Will, and Way. Many contemporary rock groups flaunt the satanic cross as well as other satanic notions."[113]

    • "Sign of Confusion: Supposedly initiated by the Romans shortly after Christ's crucifixion to instigate confusion as to who really died on the cross."[114]

    • "The Cross of Confusion... Originally a Roman symbol questioning who really died on the cross."[115]
    I haven't been able to find any evidence that this is an ancient symbol as these individuals claim. It's origins are obscure, as Warnke suggests.

    Crossbone Skull:

    In Westhoelter's General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, one finds the definition: "Crossbone Skull: The symbol for death; the last sign put on a spell to mark the end result which is death".[116]

    The symbol of the skull and crossbones was a symbol used in the ancient art of alchemy to represent putrefaction. This is what lead to the modern usage of the symbol to label packages of poisonous substances. While it certainly became recognized as a symbol of death, and later adopted in various forms as a symbol of various pirate leaders, I do not recall ever a spell listed in any grimoire that was concluded in such a fashion.

    Elements:

    In Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Rapacki includes Elements"[117] in his list of "Definitions of Satanic Terms". Rapacki correctly identifies the four elements, (earth, air, fire and water) giving their Norse and Hindu names. In a list of terms borrowed from Ritualistic Crime Consultants in his Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, Sloat defines "elements" as "Wind, fire, rain, the earth, bodies of water."[118]The elements in Wicca actually are: air, fire, water, earth and spirit.

    Enochian:

    In Painted Black, Carl Raschke claims that "A satanist does not pursue the subject of Latin, but he does endeavor to master an obscure and impenetrable language known as Enochean. Enochean is what witches are supposed to speak. It sounds little like a cross between Chinese and Arabic... LaVey wrote down and made a science out of the magical language of Enochean..."[119]

    Enochian was actually an "angelic language" with a corresponding system of magic created by the Elizabethan ceremonial magician John Dee and his medium Edward Kelley in the 17th century CE. Kelly would go into trance and spell out Enochian words supposedly revealed to him by angels while Dee transcribed Kelley's pronouncements.

    Enochian has a corresponding magical alphabet. Enochian is properly written from right to left like a Semitic language, though in modern times casual users of Enochian language or alphabets may write it from left to right as in European languages. One occasionally finds numbers interspersed with letters in Enochian: Specifically the numbers 8, 21, 26 and 30. The number 21 is meant to be read as a letter E and the other three numbers as a letter L.

    John Dee subsequently created an Enochian system of magic, based on 48 "Keys" or "Calls" obtained in Enochian language through Kelly. This was adopted a century later by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. According to Israel Regardie, the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn considered Enochian magic to be the "crown and jewel" of their system.

    In the 1960s Anton LaVey borrowed the Enochian language and 48 Keys for his Satanic Bible and its companion volume The Satanic Rituals. LaVey claimed in his books that Enochian was a Satanic language. This has led some modern Christians call Satanic beliefs "Enochian". If they had read LaVey's works more thoroughly they would have found many Latin terms in them too. If they had done a little more reading they might have discovered that Enochian is not and never has been a language used by or attributed to Witches.

    FFF:

    This ancient blessing has been transmuted into an alleged symbol of Satanism by fundamentalists obsessed with the "number of the beast". For example, in America's Best Kept Secret, Frattarola lists the number 666 next to the letters FFF, followed by "different ways which refer to the 'mark of the beast' or Satan. Note that the letter 'F' is the sixth letter of the alphabet".[120] On Madrak's Demonbusters web site, the "Disguised 666, 666 FFF" is listed as a "Demonic Symbol". [121]

    In Mystery Mark of the New Age, Texe Marrs claims that "To discover the secrets behind the mysterious number 666, we can go to two valuable sources of information. First, there is the ages-old practice of numerology. Second, we can profitably look at the very roots of the number 6, examining its dark origins."[122] Marrs then quotes extensively from Barbara Walker's The Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets. Walker states in her book that the word "hex" was derived from the Greek word "hex" and the Latin word "sex," which Walker tells us both mean the number six. Walker then says that they are cognate with the Egyptian word "sexen" which she says translates as "to embrace, to copulate".[123] From this Walker launches into a discussion of how the number six is related to sexuality. Marrs then expands on this, stating: "The religion of Babylon was primarily the worship of the Mother Goddess, who was later pictured in Revelation 17 as the great whore of Babylon, Satan's last-days world religion- a revived form of Babylonianism. In this religion six was considered the number symbolizing sacramental sexual ecstasy in which the participants achieved union with the divine universe and with the Mother Goddess. A triple 6- 666- was the magic number of the Goddess Ishtar, also called the 'Triple Aphrodite', because in her personage was the unholy trinity of Mother-Father-Son."[124]

    Walker's book is extremely popular amongst feminists, but I take issue with some of the scholarship within it. The English word "hex" actually comes from the Greek "hexe" (a female sorcerer) or "hexer" (a male sorcerer). This in turn is the source of similar words with the same meaning such as the Anglo Saxon word "haegtesse" and the modern German word for a witch, "hexe." The Greek word for the number six, "hex", though having a similar spelling, was an unrelated term. The English word "sex" is derived from the Middle English "sexe", itself derived from the Old French "sexe", in turn derived from the Latin "sexus" or "secus", from the Latin "secare" ("to cut" or "to divide"). Ayto reports that the first person to use the word "sex" to refer to sexual intercourse in English literature was D. H. Lawrence.[125] The number "six" in the English language came to us from the Indo-European "seks" through Anglo Saxon and Middle English. The Latin "sex", meaning "six" comes from the same root, as does the Greek "hex", Welsh "chwech", German "sechs", Dutch "zes", Swedish and Danish "sex" and Russian "shest".

    The English word "hex" did not come from the use of the hexagram. Nor is the hexagram used to put curses on someone or necessarily used to call upon entities. I'll discuss the origins of hex symbols and hexagrams later.

    Eventually FFF turns up in books for police officers, such as Dubois's Occult Crime.[126] The Appendix at the end The Edge of Evil, Johnston has incorrectly identified "FFF" as a version of 666 in Revelations.[127] 666 is included on Pat Pulling's "Profiling, Symptoms and Investigative Clues For Juveniles Involved in Fantasy Role Playing Games." Pulling's list is subsequently reproduced in the Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual. The Colorado Bureau of Investigations Questioned Documents Examiner's Occult Guide defines "666" as the "anti-christ." Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists FFF in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[128] Detective Don Rimer's Ritual Crime and the Occult: The New Youth Subculture includes FFF in its list of "Satanic Symbols". Other definitions of "FFF" that I've found in "occult crime manuals" include:

  • "Three sixes [is] The 'sign of the beast' as described in the Bible,... Sometimes written as 'FFF'..."[129]

  • "Mark of the Beast (Rev.13:16-18)."[130]

    Revelations 13 certainly gives the number 666 as the number of the Beast ("Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six."[131]). The Bible makes no connection between the number 6 and the letter F in this passage.

    In fact, "FFF" is an abbreviated version of "FFFF", an ancient Saxon blessing meaning "Flags, Flax, Fodder and Frigg". It is a blessing upon the house (flag stones of the hearth), possessions (flax representing clothing), food (fodder) from the Norse Goddess Frigg or Freya. The shorter three letter version stands for Flags, Flax and Fodder. Popular literature about Satanism in modern times has interpreted this shortened version as being synonymous with the number 666 (F being the sixth letter of the alphabet). FFF is a very common Neo-Pagan blessing and Neo-Pagans aren't Satanic.

    Continue on to Definitions... Symbols (A-B) - Symbols (C-F) - Symbols (G-N) - Symbols (O-S) - Symbols (T-Z)



    Footnotes...

    [74] Herold, Mary Ann. (1984). A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 55.
    [75] Paganism - Witchcraft - Satanism - The Subculture Primer, pg 12.
    [76] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 58.
    [77] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 56.
    [78] Barnhart, Robert K. (1988). Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology, H.W. Wilson, NY, pg 135.
    [79] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 86.
    [80] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 59.
    [81] Marrs, Texe: Mystery Mark of the New Age, pg 53/54.
    [82] Johnston, Jerry. (1989). The Edge of Evil, Word Publishing, Vancouver, BC, appendix.
    [83] Barnhart, Robert K., ed. (1988). Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology, pg 157.
    [84] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [85] The Colorado Bureau of Investigations Questioned Documents Examiner's Occult Guide, pg 4, 35.
    [86] Marrs, Texe. Mystery Mark of the New Age, pg 107/108.
    [87] Rimer, Don. "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse'" http://www.ogia.net/oklahoma%20gang%20investigators'%20association/occult/htm
    [88] "Wicca - Satan's Little White Lie", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w9.html
    [89] Be Aware!: A Handbook for the Purpose of Exposing Occultic Activity, WATCH Network, pg 9.
    [90] Carder, Thomas. Back To School Special, ChildCare Action Project: Christian Analysis of American Culture, http://www.capalert.com/backtoschool/backtoschool.htm
    [91] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [92] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 40.
    [93] Dubois, William. Occult Crime, pg 46.
    [94] Herold, Mary Ann. (1984). A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 41.
    [95] Be Aware!: A Handbook for the Purpose of Exposing Occultic Activity, WATCH Network, pg 5.
    [96] Barnhart, Robert K., ed. (1988). Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology, pg 228.
    [97] Alford, Clifford. Occult Crimes Investigations, pg 41.
    [98] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [99] Rimer, Don. "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse'" http://www.ogia.net/oklahoma%20gang%20investigators'%20association/occult/htm
    [100] (11 October 2002). E-mail to the author from Don Rimer.
    [101] MacDonald, Jim. (16 July 1990). "Tracking the Devil," New Hampshire Star.
    [102] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 59.
    [103] Anderson. (1769). Constitutions, pg 97.
    [104] Warnke, Mike. (1991). Schemes of Satan pg 171.
    [105] Frattarola, John: "Passport Magazine Special Edition: America's Best Kept Secret", insert "A Look At Modern Day Satanism", page 1.
    [106] Johnston, Jerry. (1989). The Edge of Evil, Word Publishing, Vancouver, BC, pg 313.
    [107] Herold, Mary Ann. A Basic Guide to the Occult for Law Enforcement Agencies, pg 31.
    [108] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 34.
    [109] Dubois, William. Occult Crime, pg 48.
    [110] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [111] Carder, Thomas. Back To School Special, ChildCare Action Project: Christian Analysis of American Culture, http://www.capalert.com/backtoschool/backtoschool.htm, emphasis in original
    [112] Warnke, Michael. (1991). Schemes of Satan, pg 183.
    [113] Carder, Thomas. Back To School Special, ChildCare Action Project: Christian Analysis of American Culture, http://www.capalert.com/backtoschool/backtoschool.htm
    [114] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 39.
    [115] William Dubois. Occult Crime Control, pg 47 and Occult Crime, pg 89.
    [116] Westhoelter, Shane. (1989). General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 59.
    [117] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 57.
    [118] Sloat, Lou: Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 78.
    [119] Ibid, pg 38.
    [120] Frattarola, John: "Passport Magazine Special Edition: America's Best Kept Secret", insert "A Look At Modern Day Satanism", page 1.
    [121] WICCA - SATAN'S LITTLE WHITE LIE", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w9.html
    [122] Marrs, Texe: Mystery Mark of the New Age, pg 63/64.
    [123] Walker, Barbara: The Woman's Encyclopedia of Myths and Secrets, pg 400-401.
    [124] Marrs, Texe: Mystery Mark of the New Age, pg 118.
    [125] Ayto, John: Arcade Dictionary of Word Origins, pg 470.
    [126] Dubois, William. Occult Crime, pg 48.
    [127] Johnston, Jerry. (1989). The Edge of Evil, Word Publishing, Vancouver, BC, pg 313.
    [128] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
    [129] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 42.
    [130] Pennsylvania State Police Missing Persons Bulletin, Bureau of Criminal Investigation- Missing Persons Unit, Volume 3, Number 3 "Satanism: The Law Enforcement Response".
    [131] Revelations 13:18 King James Version.








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    ABOUT...

    Kerr Cuhulain


    Location: Surrey, British Columbia

    Website: http://www.officersofavalon.com

    Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

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