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Witch Hunts - Exposing The Lies

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Witch Hunt Articles A-Z ...

About Policing the Shadows

Alan Herbert Peterson

Allan Yusko’s Bible Prophesy and Rapture Report

Basic Warding

Bill Schnoebelen [1]

Bill Schnoebelen [2]

Blaming 'Witchcraft's Control'

Breaking the Spell: The Hidden Traps of Wicca

Christian Authors [1]

Christian Authors [2]

Christian Authors [3]

Christian Authors [4]

Christian Authors [5]

Christian Authors [6]

Christian Authors [7]

Christian Authors [8]

Contender Ministries

Crossroads Ministries/Berit Kjos

The Crusade Against Rock & Roll [1]

The Crusade Against Rock & Roll [2]

The Crusade Against Rock & Roll [n]

The Cycle Continues

David Brown [1]

David Brown [2]

David Brown [3]

David Brown [4]

Demonbusters [1]

Demonbusters [2]

Demonbusters [3]

Demonbusters [4]

Demons (A-B)

Demons (C-G)

Demons (H-L)

Demons (M-R)

Demons (S-Z)

Demons Intro

Desiring Blessed Quietness [1]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [2]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [3]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [4]

Desiring Blessed Quietness [n]

Dogs and the Environment

Ed Decker: Saints Alive in Jesus

The Encyclopedia of Satanic Wicca

Eric Pryor [1]

Eric Pryor [2]

Eric Pryor [3]

Eric Pryor [4]

Evangelists [1]

Evangelists [2]

Evangelists [3]

Evangelists [4]

Evangelists [5]

Ex Pagan 4 Christ [1]

Ex Pagan 4 Christ [2]

Experts [1]

Experts [2]

Experts [3]

Experts [4]

Experts [5]

Experts [6]

Experts [7]

Experts [8]

Experts [n]

Experts [n]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [1]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [2]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [3]

Exposing Satanism and Democrats [4]

Jack Chick [1]

Jack Chick [2]

Jack Chick [3]

Jack Chick [4]

Jeremiah Films [1]

Jeremiah Films [2]

Jeremiah Films [3]

Jeremiah Films [4]

Jesus Messiah Fellowship [1]

Jesus Messiah Fellowship [2]

Jesus Messiah Fellowship [3]


NOTE: For a complete list of articles related to this chapter... Visit the Main Index FOR this section.










Demons (A-B)

Author: Kerr Cuhulain
Posted: July 17th. 2004
Times Viewed: 39,928

Abbadon:

In his 1993 novel Abaddon, radio evangelist Bob Larson describes the actions of demons. The imposing name of Larson's book comes from a well known character and place name in the Bible. Abaddon (Variations: Abbadon, Abbadona, Abbaton, Abadon, Obaddon) is a name derived from the Hebrew term "abad" ("to perish"). Abaddon was originally appears to have been a synonym for Hell or Sheol in several texts, such as the 1st century apocryphon The Biblical Antiquities of Philo and "The Thanksgiving Hymns" found amongst the Dead Sea Scrolls. The qabbalist Joseph ben Abraham Gikatilla lists Abaddon as the sixth of the seven lodges of Hell, under the presidency of the angel Pasiel.

In the Bible Abaddon is a destroying angel of the Apocalypse. St. John appears to have been the first to use Abaddon as the name of an angel rather than a place. Abaddon appears in Revelations 9:11: "And they had a king over them, which is the angel of the bottomless pit, whose name in the Hebrew tongue is Abaddon, but in the Greek tongue hath his name Apollyon". Abaddon is the angel who binds Satan for 1,000 years in Revelations 20. Abaddon's Greek name, "Apolluon" or "Apollyon", means "the Destroyer".

De Plancy and Grillot list Abaddon as a chief demon of Hell, equated with Samael or Satan. Milton lists Abaddon as the name for the pit of Hell in Paradise Regained. Abaddon is a synonym for the Devil in Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and the name of a demon in the third century Acts of Thomas. The Greater Key of Solomon lists Abaddon as the name Moses invoked bring down rain storms. Abaddon is the angelic ruler of the furies in The Magus. Church of Satan founder Anton LaVey lists Abaddon as one of the Infernal names in The Satanic Bible and as the name of the "Angel of the Bottomless Pit", used in the performance of the Black Mass in The Satanic Rituals. In the magical system of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, Abbadon is one of seven infernal abodes mentioned in the initiation of the Theoricus grade. In the Diabolicon, Abaddon is the daimon of temporal death and life in death. This explains why Larson chose this demon as the name of his book.

Agni:

In Mystery Mark of the New Age, Texe Marrs states that "The New Agers and the Hindus call the site where the invisible third eye is located the Agni, or Ajna Center. I found some remarkable information when I researched the doctrinal and historical foundations of the Hindu religion in regard to this teaching about a third eye. It turns out that Agni was the Hindu male fire god who was the sexual partner of the Mother Goddess. Symbolically Agni was represented as fire from heaven; lightning. Ancient peoples later began to call him by his actual name, Lucifer. When you take Agni's Mark, you are in reality taking Lucifer's mark."[7]

Agni ("fire") was the fire God in Hindu beliefs. The Hindus did not view Agni as bringing fire to earth as lightning: Rather, it was believed that his lightning brought life bringing water (rain) to earth. Agni formed a triad with Indra ("air") and Surya ("sky"). He was not the sexual partner of the "Mother Goddess" either. Agni's wife was a fire Goddess: Agnayi. Agni is in no way cognate with Lucifer. Lucifer is a Latin name that isn't as old as Agni.

Ajna is a Sanskrit term meaning "authority" or "command". As I indicated in elsewhere in this series, it is a chakra located at the pineal gland in the head, roughly between the ears and straight back behind a point between the eyebrows referred to as the "third eye". Agni is not another name for this chakra.

Ahab:

On the Demonbusters web site one finds a page with the title "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons" which lists "Ahab"[8] as a demon. Jezebel is also on the Madrak's list and Ahab was Jezebel's husband, so you didn't think that the Madraks would leave him off the list if they had Jezebel on it, did you? I'll tell you about them both in the entry for Jezebel, below.

Amenon:

Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists "Amenon" as the "Ruler of the Spirits of the East."[9] While I've found the names of many entities, such as Oriens, alleged to be the "ruler of spirits in the east" in the grimoires that I've seen over the years, I've never encountered one by this name before. In E. Cobham Brewer's 1898 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable one finds a listing for Amenon, who is described as a "hero of Chaldea, who reigned 12 sares". A sare is 3,600 years.[10] You also can find this name in a Xena the Warrior Princess web site called Land in Turmoil.[11] Look on the page Murder Most Unreal in this site and you'll find that Amenon is an evil judge.[12] Later in the list Sloat lists "Eltzen" as the ruler of spirits of the north. Curiously, Sloat doesn't give any names for spirits of the south or west. I suspect that these are names that Sloat has borrowed from an Fantasy Role Playing Game.

Amy:

Amy is a name which appears in a "Satanic Circle" depicted in Alford's Occult Crimes Investigations. "Amy" is the fifty eighth spirit of the Lemegeton, described as a great president who appears as a flaming fire. The Lemegeton says that Amy has the power to impart knowledge of astrology and liberal sciences, the power to locate treasures hidden by spirits and the power to assign good familiars. He commands 36 legions of spirits.

Anakim:

Anakim is listed as a demon on the Demonbusters web site in the section with the title "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons".[13] Anakim is a name derived from a Hebrew term, "ONQIM" ("giants"). In Judaic mythology the Anakim were the offspring of fallen angels and mortal women, mentioned in Genesis 6 in the Bible as well as in The Zohar. Anakim appears on the first line of a gnomonic square used to cause a familiar spirit to appear in the form of a lion in the Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage.

Ananais:

Ananias is listed as a demon on the Demonbusters web site in the section "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons".[14] Ananias isn't a demon, we was the high priest before whom the prophet Paul was tried (Acts 23:2‑5; 24:1; 25:2).

Anari:

Anari is defined as "A forest or jungle" in a list of terms borrowed from Ritualistic Crime Consultants in Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual.[15] Anari is the name of an elven woman who is a character in a fantasy role playing game called Broken Dagger. You'll find the Broken Dagger community easily on the internet (http://www.brokendagger.com). Neither Satanists, nor Neo-Pagans or members of Afro-Caribbean religions use this term.

Apollo:

Madrak's short list of "Gods / Goddesses" on their Demonbusters web site includes Apollo.[16] In both Greek and Roman mythology Apollo was the God of the Sun, fertility, medicine, music, poetry, eloquence and truth. He was the son of Zeus and Leto and the twin brother of the Goddess Artemis. The Madraks may have been influenced in including Apollo on this list because Apollo is one of the "watery reflections of the three enthusiasms" in Crowley's Liber HHH, the other two being Dionysus and Aphrodite. Crowley also mentions Apollo in Liber A'Ash and Liber DCCCXI.

Apollyon:

Apollyon is listed as a demon on the Demonbusters web in the section "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons".[17] Apollyon (Variations: Apollion, Apolhun, Appolyon) is a name derived from the Greek terms "Apolluon" or "Apollyon" ("the Destroyer"). Apollyon is another name for Abaddon, a destroying angel of the Apocalypse. In Revelations 9:11 Apollyon is the angel of the bottomless pit. In The Magus he has become a fallen angel who is a deceiver as well as the leader of the Furies. Apollyon is one of the Infernal names listed in Anton LaVey's Satanic Bible.

Aradia:

Jules Michelet was a popular French scholar of the early 1800s. Michelet wrote a book entitled La Sorciere, claiming to be a description of the rites of medieval Witches, describing them as followers of a pre-Christian Goddess religion. La Sorciere was a best seller, but the scholarship that went into it was poor. Michelet was not a good historian even by the standards of his era, and his book was basically a romantic flight of fancy. Michelet reported that the name of the Goddess of this ancient religion was "Herodias." This is the name of a very wicked woman who appears in the chapters Matthew (14:3, 14:6), Mark (6:17, 6:19, 6:22) and Luke (3:19) in the New Testament of the Bible.

Now in the 10th century the Church issued the Canon Episcopi, which claimed that literal belief in witchcraft was folly because it was an illusion inspired by Satan. The Canon, re-enacted several times until the Council of Treves in 1310, gave the name Herodias as the name of the leader of the "Wild Hunt," the nocturnal procession of the Goddess of the Hunt and her retinue. Michelet probably thought that this was based on factual accounts, rather than the speculation of Church theologians of the time.

Charles Geoffrey Leland, a lawyer and soldier of fortune, took up this same idea in 1899 with his book Aradia: Gospel of the Witches. This was allegedly a description of traditional Tuscan witchcraft as described to him by a witch named Maddelena and a translation of their "gospel," which he named "Vangelo." It bears a striking resemblance to Michelet's earlier La Sorciere. Originally the name of the Goddess in Leland's book was identical to that in Michelet's book: "Herodias." Once rendered into Italian, "Herodias" became "Aradia".

The first problem with Leland's allegations is that no historian or folklorist has found any evidence of the Tuscan witch cult described by Leland, nor any evidence of a goddess named "Aradia". Leland's original use of the name "Herodias" clearly shows that he was borrowing from the Canon Episcopi and/or the Bible. Secondly, the language of Vangelo, the witch "gospel" allegedly recovered by Leland, is unmistakably nineteenth century, and not fourteenth century as Leland suggests.

The first chapter of Leland's Aradia tells us that "Diana greatly loved her brother Lucifer, the god of the Sun and the Moon, the god of Light (splendor), who was so proud of his beauty, and who for his pride was driven from Paradise."[18] This paragraph in this interesting yet fraudulent text is where many Christian authors seem to have got the idea that Lucifer and Diana are a part of the same mythology. You'll see this story being cited again and again by the people that I write about in Witch Hunts.

Asmodeus:

In Schemes of Satan, Warnke states that "Asmodeus was an evil being who was known as the 'king of the demons.' He is also identified with Beelzebul... "[19] On the Ex Pagans 4 Christ web site, Asmodeus shows up as the name of a high priest in a coven that Keziah Thomas claims to have belonged to.

Asmodeus is a Biblical figure, adopted from Zoroastrianism, who appears in the Apocrypha. Zoroaster named this entity "Aeshma-daeva" ("demon of fury"), so Warnke's translation of the name is incorrect. The name Asmodeus does not appear at all in the Lemegeton. The name that does appear in the Lemegeton is Asmoday, who is the thirty second spirit, described as a king who appears with a serpent's tail, webbed feet and with three heads that vomit fire: a bull, a man and a ram. The Lemegeton names Asmoday as one of the four chiefs of the seventy two spirits of the Goetia. Asmodeus and Beelzebul are two entirely different entities. Beelzebul does not appear in the Lemegeton either.

Astaroth:

In Schemes of Satan, Warnke describes Astaroth: "Also known as Astarte, Astaroth is the Phoenician goddess of fertility and of sexual love. Asmodeus: ...derived from a Hebrew term that means 'destroyer'." [20] Madrak's short list of "Gods / Goddesses" on their Demonbusters web site includes "Ashtar, Ashoreth, Ashtoreh, Istar, Astar.[21] Tal Brook teamed up with Russ Wise to write an article, "Goddess Worship", for the Winter 1998/99 issue of the SCP Newsletter. They mention this entity in their anti-feminist article:

"The goddess has returned. She who brought judgment on the hillsides of apostate Israel--the Ashteroth from Canaan whose altars were condemned by God--is being revered and embraced by today's followers of witchcraft, radical feminism, the occult, and increasingly, those in the liberal church. Neopagans look toward an idealized feminine age to heal the world. To them, the masculine age has been an age of destruction and broken relationships. But "feminine energies" promise to bring balance to the destructive aspects of the Piscean Age--so says this emerging myth."[22]

In the film The Massacre of Innocence Eric Holmberg' makes the argument that abortions create Goddess religion. His argument hinges on his claim that Astaroth is the "demon of fertility and erotic love and is known by many other names (Astarte, Aphrodite, etc)". He calls Aphrodite "the goddess of child sacrifice." He cites the Chambre Ardente incident involving Madame de Montespan in Louis XIV's court as proof of his claims. Curiously, Holmberg does not call it Satanism or a Black Mass. Instead Holmberg dwells on the fact that during one of the Black Masses the participants called upon "Ashtaroth", which he says is proof of the link between Witchcraft and child sacrifice. The Chambre Ardente incident was a parody of the Catholic Mass, based on Christian liturgy and not on ancient Pagan practices.

Astarte was a Caananite version of the Goddess Ishtar, a fertility Goddess. Aprhodite was a Greek Goddess of fertility and love. Contrary to Holmberg's pronouncements, the worship of these Goddesses did not involve child sacrifice at all. Holmberg is wrong about magical grimoires connecting Astaroth with sacrifice too. Astaroth appears in grimoires variously as an angel, spirit, duke or demon. In a fashion typical of these Judeo Christian magickal texts, Astaroth is turned into a male entity. The powers usually attributed to Astaroth in these grimoires involves the ability to divine the location of hidden wealth or create storms. None of these aspects involves sacrifice. Holmberg is obviously basing his entire premise on the Chambre Ardente affair, which was, as I have already said, an invention of renegade Christians, not Pagans.

Holmberg quotes from the first book of Kings and links Jezebel to Baal and Astaroth "the demons of child sacrifice."

Astaroth is a Hebrew name, "OShThRvTh", meaning "flocks," "crowds" or "assemblies." Warnke is partially right in that Astaroth is used in the Bible as an alternate name for Astarte, a Canaanite goddess of love. Ashtart is the name the Phoenicians used for this Goddess: Astaroth is a name assigned by the Bible, not the Phoenicians. Astaroth is found in 1 Samuel 7:3,4, 1 Samuel 12:10, 1 Samuel 31:10 ("Because that they have forsaken me, and have worshiped Ashtoreth the goddess of the Zidonians..."), Judges 2:13 and Judges 10:6 ("And the children of Israel did evil again in the sight of the Lord, and served Baal-im, and Astaroth, and the gods of Syria, and the gods of Zidon, and the gods of Moab, and the gods of the children of Ammon, and the gods of the Philistines, and forsook the Lord, and served not him").

Astaroth is the twenty ninth spirit of the Lemegeton, described as a duke who appears as an angel, not a demon as Warnke suggests. Some translations describe this angel as beautiful, but with awful breath and other translations describe this angel as foul looking. The Lemegeton assigns Astaroth the power of divination and the ability to reveal secrets.

Astarte:

Astarte's name came up in the previous section on Astaroth as well as in several other sections in this article. Her name appears on the Ex Pagans 4 Christ web site created by supposed former "Witch Queen" Keziah Thomas. You'll see Astarte come up in Eric Holmberg's anti-Pagan films. Astarte was a Caananite version of the Goddess Ishtar, a fertility Goddess

Avim:



Avim is listed as a demon on the Demonbusters web site in the section "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons".[23] Avim is a place and a tribe, not a demon. In the Bible it is a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:23) and a tribe in southern Palestine.

Baal:

As we've seen elsewhere in this series, Baal is a demon mentioned in many occult crime manuals: He is mentioned in Westhoelters NIN manual and his name appears in a diagram of a "Satanic Circle" in Clifford Alford's Occult Crimes Investigations. Warnke describes him as "Baal: Also known as Hadad,"[24] Baal's name turns up on Keziah Thomas's Ex Pagans 4 Christ web site.

In Matrisciana's 1991 film Halloween: Trick or Treat, Eric Holmberg quotes from the first book of Kings and links Jezebel to Baal and Astaroth "the demons of child sacrifice." Holmberg then quotes from Revelation 2:20: "But I have this against you, that you tolerate the woman Jezebel, who calls herself a prophetess, and she teaches and leads my bond servants astray, so that they commit acts of immorality and eat things sacrificed to idols". In none of the grimoires in which Baal is named (the Grand Grimoire, the Pseudo-Monarchia, the Dictionaire Infernal, Levi's Transcendental Magic, and De Givry's Witchcraft, Magic and Alchemy) is Baal listed as a demon of child sacrifice.

In this same movie Matrisciana gives other examples of her lack of knowledge of things Celtic by stating: "The ancient Druids worshipped Baal, one of the most powerful of all the demon kings. In the list of Enochian demons, Baal is said to be a king which is at the power of the east [sic]. Eastern religions emphasize that spiritual power comes from meditation. The common denominator between Druids, Witches and Satanists is the practice of meditation for the purpose of making contact with the spirits of the dead or disembodied spirits." The scene being shown while Matrisciana says this is of Wiccans celebrating in a rather smoky circle. Enochian demons are part of the Judeo-Christian magical tradition, not Druid or Wiccan beliefs. Many religions practice meditation, and just because they share a particular practice does not mean that everything else they do is the same. Druid beliefs aren't an "Eastern religion" as Matrisciana claims here: The Celts were centered in Western Europe. Matrisciana has obviously mistaken Baal for Bel/Belenus/Bile, a God of the Celtic underworld.

In Larry Jones' File 18 newsletter David Brown also tries to link Baal to Halloween and the Druids: "The god whom the Druids worshiped was Baal, as the blazing Baal-fires show... we know they offered human sacrifices...we have evidence that they made 'their children pass through the fire to Molech', and that makes it highly probable that they also offered them in sacrifice... we find that these things were parts of one and the same system... Priests of Nimrod or Baal were necessarily required to eat of the human sacrifices; and thus it has come to pass the 'Cahna-Bal', (Canha is the emphatic form of Cahn which means 'a priest') meaning the priest of Baal, is the established word in our tongue for a devourer of human flesh."[25]

Brown's etymology is imaginative but entirely inaccurate. "Cannibal" is a name originally given by the conquering Spaniards to the Carib peoples of the West Indies. It is a variation of the word "Caribes", first used by Christopher Columbus, which comes in turn from the word "Carib" in the Arawakan language of the Caribbean and South America. "Carib" is related to the name that the Carib's gave to themselves: "Galibi" ("strong men"). The word cannibal later came to mean people who eat human flesh because these early Spaniards believed that the Carib people did so. It has absolutely nothing to do with the Bible or Middle Eastern history. This is just another example of a fundamentalist trying to make connections with the ubiquitous Baal. Baal was a Phoenician deity, Nimrod a king who appears in the Bible and Molech a name derived from a Hebrew term meaning "king". None of these is or was used by Druids.

Baal does not appear in the Lemegeton. Originally a Phoenician vegetation and storm God whose name translates as "lord", Baal is mentioned many times in the Old Testament, an example being Judges 2:13: "And they forsook the Lord, and served Baal and Ashtaroth." Baal was a pre-Biblical Phoenician vegetation and storm God whose name translates as "lord". Baal is mentioned many times in the Old Testament, an example being Judges 2:13: "And they forsook the Lord, and served Baal and Ashtaroth". In some places in the Bible Baal has become a demon. In other instances the Bible uses the name Baal simply as a synonym for "Lord", as in the name Baal zebub ("Lord of the Flies"). In The Zohar, Baal is cognate with the angel Raphael. In the Grand Grimoire, Baal is a subordinate of Lucifuge Rocofale. In his Pseudo-Monarchia, Wierus lists Baal as the Commander in Chief of the armies of Beelzebuth. He is described as having three heads: toad, cat and man. In Levi's Transcendental Magic, Baal is the leader of the Harab-Serapel. Baal is a demon mentioned by Grillot De Givry in his Witchcraft, Magic and Alchemy. In the Dictionaire Infernal, Baal is listed as a demon.

Balaam:

Balaam is listed as a demon on the Demonbusters web site in the section "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons".[26] Balaam (Variations: Balam, Balan) is a Hebrew name meaning "destruction". In the Bible Balaam was a Mesopotamian soothsayer and prophet (Deuteronomy 23, Joshua 13 and many other books). Balaam is one of the Infernal names listed in Anton LaVey's Satanic Bible and an entity mentioned in "Homage to Tchort" in LaVey's The Satanic Rituals, which is probably what prompted this entry on the Madrak's list.

Baphomet:

In his America's Best Kept Secret, John Frattarola lists "Baphomet" as an inverted pentagram, defining it as follows: "...often called the 'baphomet', is strictly Satanic in nature and represents the goat's head."[27] Shane Westhoelter, in his General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, lists Baphomet as a symbol of the Templars.[28] Lyle Rapacki, in Satanism: The Not So New Problem, claims that Baphomet "At one time was worshipped by the Knights Templar and later by those who took part in the Black Mass. Today it is seen as a deity, a goat-headed god with angelic wings, the breasts of a female, and an illuminated torch between his horns".[29] The description of Baphomet that Rapacki is presenting here is of the picture that first appeared in 1896 in the book Transcendental Magic by Eliphas Levi. The Watch Network mentions Baphomet in their Be Aware! handbook: "The presence of books about Satanism or the occult...robes (usually black, but perhaps red or other colours...The altar- traditionally a nude woman is the actual altar, but she would lay on a sort of table or slab of stone or metal...The symbol of Baphomet, or the goat of Mendes... Candles... Bell... Chalice."[30]

Eventually Baphomet shows up in law enforcement manuals. It is listed in Anderson's Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime as the "Emblem of Baphomet".[31] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists "baphomet" and "goat's heads" in an untitled list of symbols attributed to Satanism.[32] Rimer's "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse" contains a "Glossary of Occult Terms" which describes Baphomet as "The human creature with a goat's head."[33]

Baphomet is a bisexual idol or spiritual symbol, usually with goat attributes, that the Knights Templar were accused of worshipping in the 14th Century CE. There are several theories about how this name was derived. Some suggest that Baphomet is simply a corruption of Mohammed, a theory probably first advanced by the Crusaders who considered the Islamic faith demonic. Some say that it comes from the Arabic "abu-fihamat" ("father of wisdom"). Some say that it is from the phrase "Baphe Meteos" ("baptism of Metis"), Metis being a Greek Goddess of knowledge. Others suggest that Baphomet is "Tem ohp ab" backwards, this being an abbreviation for the expression "Templi omium hominum pacis abbas" ("the father of the temple of peace of all men").

Aleister Crowley used Baphomet in his books Liber Samekh, Liber A'Ash and in his version of the Gnostic Mass. Anton LaVey adopted Baphomet as a symbol in the form of an inverse pentagram with a goat's head superimposed on it, surrounded by the Hebrew letters lamed, vau, yod, tau and nun (LVYTN). These letters spell the Hebrew rendering of the name Leviathan. The name Baphomet also appears as one of the Infernal names listed in Anton LaVey's Satanic Bible and in the Black Mass and Satanic Baptism in his Satanic Rituals. This may have been where individuals like Westhoelter and Frattarola got the idea that Baphomet was a Satanic entity.

Beelzebub:

Clifford Alford mistakenly refers to a spirit Beeazlebub" in his Occult Crimes Investigations. Obviously Alford is referring to Beelzebub here. Beelzebub shows up in Lt. Norman Mitchell's Hidden Practices and in the "Glossary of Occult Terms" in Detective Don Rimer's "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse" as "Beelzebub: The prince of demons."[34]

Known variations of this name include: Beelzebuth, Belzebuth, Beelzeboul, Baalzebub, Belzebut, Belzeboub and Belzebud, but not Beeazlebub. This Latin name is derived from the Hebrew term "Baalzebub" and means "lord of flies" ("Baal", meaning "lord" + "zebub" ("ZBVB"), meaning a fly or insect). Originally a Syrian God, Beelzebub appears in the New Testament of the Bible, examples being Mathew 10:25, 12:24 ("But when the Pharisees heard it, they said, This fellow doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub the prince of the devils"), and Mark 3:22 ("And the scribes which came down from Jerusalem said, He hath Beelzebub, and by the prince of the devils casteth he out devils"). Groups such as the Essenes created personifications of evil such as Beelzebub to denounce their opponents, claiming that their opponents had been seduced by these personifications of evil.

In Milton's Paradise Lost, Beelzebub was Satan's chief lieutenant among the fallen angels. In the Grimorium Verum Beelzebub is called the prince of spirits. According to Eliphas Levi, Beelzebub was the leader of the Chaigidel. Beelzebub was described as the supreme chieftain of demons in Alexis De Terreneuve de Thym's autobiography Farfadets, Ou Tous Le Demons Ne Sont Pas L'autre Monde. Beelzebub was the leader of the "false gods" in Barret's The Magus. Beelzebub is one of the Infernal names listed in Anton LaVey's Satanic Bible, as well as a name used in the performance of a Black Mass in LaVey's The Satanic Rituals. Beelzebub is an archdaimon who is Satan's second in command, who makes one of the "Statements" in the Diabolicon. Beelzebub is a prince of the demonic order of Seraphim listed by Michaelis in his Admirable History. He is also a demon of gluttony listed by Binsfield.

Belial:

In Schemes of Satan, Warnke states that "Belial: ... [is] uniformly regarded as the proper name for the prince of evil- Satan."[35] Rapacki describes Belial as "The most vicious of all demons. He is identified with death and evil. He is the demon of destruction".[36] Belial is listed on Madrak's "Satanists and Setians" list on his Demonbusters web site.[37] The same site has a page with the title "Learn About The Real Enemy- Satan and his Followers- Names of Satan and His Demons" which also lists "Belial".[38] Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual lists the definition: "Belial: Without a master."[39] This brief and cryptic definition suggests that Belial is a adjective, rather than a name.

Belial is a Hebrew name, "BLIOL," meaning "wicked one." It appears in numerous places in the Old Testament, such as Deuteronomy 13:13, Judges and 1 Samuel. Belial is the sixty eighth spirit of the Lemegeton, described as a king, created next after Lucifer, who appears as a beautiful angel seated in a chariot of fire, not a demon. The Lemegeton names Belial as one of the four chiefs of the seventy two spirits of the Goetia. The Lemegeton assigns him the power to win the favors of friends and foes, to give familiars, and to make men senators. Belial was not used as an alternative name for Satan as Warnke suggests, appearing in many grimoires as a separate entity along side or subordinate to Satan. None of these listings would suggest that Belial is, as Rapacki suggests, "the demon of destruction.

Black Walkers/Mord Wraiths:

"Black Walkers & Mord Wraths [sic]" are defined as the "Servants created or born from evil and black magic to be protectors of witches and warlock lords"[40] in a list of terms borrowed from Ritualistic Crime Consultants in Lou Sloat's Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual. This is obviously a misspelling of the term "Mord Wraiths" (who are the "Black Walkers") from fantasy writer Terry Brooks's Sword of Shannara series. These fictional characters, who appear in the book Wishsong of Shannara, are not used in Satanism, Neo-Pagan religion or Afro-Caribbean religion.

Buddha:

Buddha is included in Madrak's short list of "Gods/Goddesses" on their Demonbusters web site.[41] Bill Schnoebelen claims that Jack O'Lanterns are a symbol of "the Lord of the Dead, a 'god', just like a Buddha- in short an idol"[42] Buddha is not a Buddhist "lord of the dead", a God or an "idol." Buddha is the enlightened man in Buddhism. It is typical of such fundamentalist "experts" to lump all non Christian religions together under the category of Satanism.

Continue on to Definitions... Demons (A-B) - Demons (C-G) - Demons (H-L) - Demons (M-R) - Demons (S-Z)



Footnotes...

[7] Marrs, Texe: Mystery Mark of the New Age, pg 70.
[8] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[9] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 14.
[10] E. Cobham Brewer. (1898) Dictionary of Phrase and Fable.
[11] Land In Turmoil Web site: http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Academy/2015/landinturmoil.html
[12] Murder Most Unreal: http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Academy/2015/murder.html
[13] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[14] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[15] Sloat, Lou: Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 78.

[16] Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[17] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[18] Leland, Charles Geoffrey. (1899). Aradia: Gospel of the Witches, pg 1.
[19] Warnke, Schemes of Satan. Pg 167.
[20] Warnke, Schemes of Satan. Pg 167.
[21] Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[22] Brooke, Tal & Wise, Russ. (Winter 1998/99). "Goddess Worship," SCP Newsletter, WINTER 1998/99, Volume 23:2
[23] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[24] Warnke, Schemes of Satan. Pg 167.
[25] File 18, CCIN Inc, Vol. 5, No. 90-5, pg 2, emphasis in original.
[26] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[27] Frattarola, John: "Passport Magazine Special Edition: America's Best Kept Secret", insert "A Look At Modern Day Satanism", page 2.
[28] Westhoelter, Shane. General Information Manual With Respect to Satanism and the Occult, National Information Network, pg 69.
[29] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 55.
[30] Be Aware!: A Handbook for the Purpose of Exposing Occultic Activity, WATCH Network, pg 2.
[31] Anderson, Sgt Edwin C, Jr.: Law Enforcement Guide to Occult Related Crime, California State University Police, pg 35.
[32] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 28.
[33] Rimer, Don. "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse'" http://www.ogia.net/oklahoma%20gang%20investigators'%20association/occult/htm
[34] Rimer, Don. "Symptoms Characterizing Occult Ritual Abuse'" http://www.ogia.net/oklahoma%20gang%20investigators'%20association/occult/htm
[35] Warnke, Schemes of Satan, pg 167.
[36] Rapacki, Lyle J. (1988). Satanism: The Not So New Problem, Intel, pg 55.
[37] "Demons and Characteristics", http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html.
[38] "Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[39] Sloat, Lou. (Date unknown). Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 15.
[40] Sloat, Lou: Texas Ritualistic Crime Information Network Occult Crime Manual, pg 78.
[41] Demons and Characteristics" http://www.demonbuster.com/zpart2‑w11.html
[42] Ibid, pp 8, emphasis in original.








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ABOUT...

Kerr Cuhulain


Location: Surrey, British Columbia

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Bio: Kerr Cuhulain the author of this article, is known to the mundane world as Detective Constable Charles Ennis. Ennis, a former child abuse investigator, is the author of several articles on child abuse investigation that appeared in Law & Order Magazine. Better known to the Pagan community by his Wiccan name, Kerr Cuhulain, Ennis was the first Wiccan police officer to go public about his beliefs 28 years ago. Kerr is now the Preceptor General of Officers of Avalon. Kerr went on to write four books: The Law Enforcement Guide to Wicca (Horned Owl Publishing), Wiccan Warrior and Full Contact Magick: A Book of Shadows for the Wiccan Warrior. (Llewellyn Publications), as well as a book based on this series: Witch Hunts: Out of the Broom Closet (Spiral Publishing).

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